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Course Descriptions

To find the description for a class, please use the menu below to navigate the course listings by credit area.

List of Credit Areas :
Community Service
Cultural Arts
Enrichment
Health
Language Arts
Mathematics
Modern Language and Culture
Physical Education
Science
Social Studies

Please click here to see a list of courses offered by term and by class period.

To see more specific information about graduation requirements, click here.


COMMUNITY SERVICE (CS)
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Students are required to take 6 courses in Community Service (2 years) to graduate.

Building Techniques 
Students in this class will work on a construction project on campus. Past projects have included a shed for storage, a tree house, and a hut for the pigs belonging to the Lower School.
CREDIT: CS (term)

FixIt!
 In this class, we will learn about the Repair Movement and fix stuff on campus. In partnership with the Shop staff, we will take on projects that need to get done in all of the campus units and buildings. Projects may include fixing doors and steps, painting, fixing roads and pathways, and more.
CREDIT:  CS (term)

Quaker Advocacy
In this course, students travel to Washington, DC, for four days to lobby Congress and participate in the Friends Committee on National Legislation’s (FCNL) Spring Lobby Weekend. To prepare for the trip, students first delve into the details of the public policy issue identified by FCNL. In the past, we’ve studied climate change legislation, energy efficiency, drone policies, mass incarceration, and the authorization for the use of military force. After building our public policy knowledge, we use Quaker/consensus process to draft a school-wide declaration of beliefs. In the past, we’ve used Quaker-clerking style small group discussions to facilitate consensus. In this course’s second half, students decide how they wish to apply their newfound lobbying and advocacy skills. In the past, we’ve lobbied the North Carolina General Assembly for climate change legislation, LGBTQ workplace protections, pro-renewable energy laws, and other initiatives.

CREDIT: SS or CS (term)

Student Ambassadors
Prerequisite: Students must sign up for a minimum of 2 terms. Terms do not have to be consecutive. 
Student Ambassadors work closely with the Upper School Dean for Students. They provide a communication link between staff and students. They support and welcome students new to the Upper School. Specific class activities are decided as a result of confidential discussions. Student Ambassadors are called on to play a leadership role in the community and should demonstrate the following qualities:

●       Able to abide by confidentiality agreement

●       Approachable

●       Genuinely invested in the well-being of the school

●       Comfortable talking with teachers

●       Willing to give up outside class time

●       Able to set a good example for CFS students

●       Friendly

●       Honest and respectful

●       Responsible

●       Good listener

●       Mature enough to stay neutral 

CREDIT: CS (2 terms)

Student Liaisons
Juniors and seniors only
This two-term service class fulfills two purposes. First, this group of 11th and 12th graders will participate in the CFS Life classes (fall and winter terms), seeking to befriend, mentor, and support the freshmen as they acclimate to high school life. These students will play a key role in helping to build cohesion and leadership in the freshman class. Students will join the 9th graders on retreat days, and ideally (but not required)  accompany them to Newton Grove in the Spring. Second, this group will commit to attending Clerks regularly. Students must apply to be considered for this course.
CREDIT: CS (two terms)

Sustainable Farming Research
In this class, we will envision and help others envision a sustainable farm. We will interview teachers and students in other units and document our school’s environmental curriculum. A component of this class will be service to and engagement with the Stewardship Committee around the long-term feasibility of a campus farm idea. This class will evolve into 2nd and 3rd term electives based on what we learn.
CREDIT:  CS (term)

 Sustainable Farming Design
This class will build on the data gathered from the first term, combined with our own research. We will visit local farms, learn about permaculture, and study farming best practices. Open to all students regardless of enrollment in the first term.
CREDIT: CS (term)

Sustainable Farming Practices
This class will build on the data gathered from the first two  terms. Open to all students regardless of enrollment in the other terms.
CREDIT: CS (term)

Teacher’s Assistant
Teacher’s Assistants work in the Campus Early School, Lower School, Middle School, Upper School, and the Center.  In the younger units students might help younger students with their work or assist the classroom teachers with an assortment of tasks.  Students may work in the Lower School library or in the Middle School/Upper School library.  Students may also serve as a teacher's assistant in the Upper School, either for a specific teacher or in the Main Office.  Students who TA in the Center will assist with general work for the entire school.  Students should check with individual teachers for such service opportunities before signing up.
CREDIT:  CS (term)

Teacher’s Assistant:  Art Studio
Students interested in doing service work in the studio are welcome during any period of the day.  If you have a specific interest like ceramics or photography, please sign up to assist in those areas.
CREDIT:  CS (term)

Teacher’s Assistant: Computer Lab 
TAs in the Computer Lab will provide assistance to computer users by answering questions about the hardware and software.  They will also help to clean and maintain the equipment, install software, make signs, photocopy, and do data entry.
CREDIT:  CS (term)

Tech Theater
This class will function as support for the Upper School Dance Concert and Spring Play. Class work might include set building and design. 
CREDIT: CS or CA-PA (term)

Upper School Newspaper
This is a project based class, open to 9th through 12th graders, in which we create and produce a student newspaper. The specific nature of this publication will be determined by members of the class. Whether we decide on sassy and parodic, serious and thoughtful, or some combination thereof, we will review media ethics and the role of news reporting in our society, including some historic highs and lows. Students will learn how to gather background material and check facts, conduct an interview, write news and feature stories, craft effective headlines, and design and lay out a news publication. We will produce several issues of the paper in both print and online formats.
CREDIT: CS or ER (term)

Upper School Service
In Upper School Service classes, students will be caring for the grounds, doing some work on buildings, and generally helping to keep the school running. This class also helps to manage the school's recycling program.
CREDIT: CS (term)

Upper School Yearbook
Students in this two-trimester class will comprise the staff of the 2016-17 Upper School yearbook.  Together they will plan, design and produce the yearbook from start to finish. This is an excellent opportunity for anyone interested in photography, drawing, graphic design, marketing, editing, bookkeeping, desktop publishing, and/or project management. There are roles for anyone interested in finding out how a yearbook is made. Close attention to detail is a critical component of this class. Students will have individual responsibilities but will work cooperatively as a team with one common goal: a yearbook to be proud of.
CREDIT: CS or CA-VA (two terms)


CULTURAL ARTS (CA)
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Students are required to take a total of eight Cultural Arts courses to graduate. Two of these courses must be in the Visual Arts (CA-VA), two in the Performing Arts (CA-PA). Most music classes count as performing arts.

Music

Music Ensembles 1 & 2
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
These are ensembles for students with an intermediate or advanced skill set on an instrument. We will focus on building skills as and possibly even venture into writing original material for the ensemble to play. We will give special attention to theory that will help guide each student’s approach to playing the music. We will build a diverse repertoire of material and perform several times of the course of the year.
CREDIT: CA-PA (year)

Music History
How did music evolve into the many genres we listen to today? In this class we'll study the evolution of music from its beginnings in various parts of the world.  We’ll learn about European classical music, American blues and jazz, and the origins of rock, hip-hop, rap, metal, and pop. We’ll learn about some fascinating characters along the way – from Igor Stravinsky and John Cage to Mos Def and David Bowie.  This class is open to all.  Come ready to listen and explore our musical worlds.
CREDIT: CA (term)


Music Theory & Composition
In  this class, we will compose original music using written notation.  We will make use of the flash-based software, Noteflight, to compose original works.  The class will cover many different compositional styles and will focus on getting students working on original music.  We will write simple melodic lines and progress towards multi-voice writing.  Lessons in music theory and listening activities will be core aspects of this class.  Open to all students regardless of musical background!
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

Percussion Ensemble
This music class is open to all!  Come learn about the world of rhythm as we explore the foundations of percussion music by putting together polyrhythmic music.  We will learn about tempo and pulse, meter, swing, and improvisation, but will mostly spend our time playing music.  This class works best when it’s large, so sign up and encourage your friends!  It’ll be a fun and learning-filled good time!
CREDIT: CA-PA  (term)

Quaker N'oats
The Upper School a capella group, the Quaker N'oats, is open to all interested students. The group performs at many school functions including Risers' Night, Visitors' Day, and Graduation.
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

 

Performing Arts (CA-PA)
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Beginning Acting
This class introduces students to basics of theater performance, and is a prerequisite to participation in any advanced classes or performances. We will work on rudimentary aspects of drama such as physical theater, improvisation, movement, Viewpoints, mask, voice, and ensemble awareness. Students should come to class prepared to move, and wear non-restrictive clothing and shoes. The class is required for all students wishing to participate in school theater productions.
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

Fall Production
Prerequisite: Beginning Acting or equivalent course with permission of instructor.
This class will focus on the production of an evening length performance offered to the CFS community and general public.
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

 Improvisation for Theater/Advanced Acting
Spontaneity is an important tool for actors, allowing them to create fluid characters in scripted work, as well as generating material for improvisational performance. We'll play theater games, learn how to make split second decisions for plot and character, and learn how to say "Yes" to everything our classmates propose on stage. Come prepared to play.

CREDIT: CA-PA (term) 

Playwriting
This class teaches students the fundamentals of dramatic structure and character development, as well as introducing a vocabulary for theatrical performance. We will work daily on creative writing exercises that help the playwright craft intelligent and engaging theater. Our goal is to write a short one act play. Successful pieces will be considered for inclusion in the following year’s Winter One Act play festival.
CREDIT: LA or CA-PA (term)

Public Speaking
Over the course of this term, students will learn the fundamentals of public speaking and explore various styles of presentations, from debate to storytelling and many in between. Weekly practices will culminate in a final presentation in a style and on a topic of each student's choice.
CREDIT: ER or CA-PA (term)

Spring Play
Prerequisite: Beginning Acting
Students will rehearse, produce, and perform our Upper School dramatic offering. CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

Tech Theater
This class will function as support for the Upper School Dance Concert and Spring Play. Class work might include set building and design. 
CREDIT: CS or CA-PA (term)

Winter One-Act Festival 
Prerequisite: Beginning Acting
This class will curate five or six short one act plays to perform as part of the Annual US Winter One Act Festival. Students will direct, produce, and perform all work.
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

 Dance - Introductory/Intermediate Level

Dance classes in which students are physically active are cross-listed as Physical Education and Cultural/Performing Arts classes. Students may meet either of those requirements with a dance class, but may not count one class toward both requirements.


Contemporary Dance Styles
Have you ever wondered about the vast range of techniques and styles that make up modern and contemporary  dance? This diverse and exciting dance experience will provide an opportunity to work with a series of guest artists in specific styles. These guest artists will each teach a unit on their particular area of expertise. The styles will range from traditional modern to hip-hop to aerial dance. It is a chance to develop your technical skills as you experiment with new ways of moving your body. Along the way we will analyze the characteristics of each style of dance and study some of the choreographers who have brought the style forward. Students will be required to dress out and participate on a daily basis. There will be required outside reading and in class journal  reflections. Students are limited to 3 excused absences for course credit.

CREDIT: CA-PA or PE (term)

Dance: Shaping an Impulse
This class will focus on conditioning your body and developing your technical skill level in dance as an art form. Looking at the work of Rudolph Laban and his analysis of time/space/weight/flow and the effort actions, you will develop skill at copying the details of a movement. After analyzing your own movement style, you will then work on the specific communication through movement that is required of a dancer or any performer. Expect to be challenged technically and creatively in this class. We will look at the body from many viewpoints.
CREDIT AREA: CA-PA or PE (term)

Experiential Anatomy for Dancers and Athletes
This dance class will be participatory in nature and we will move every day. It will provide an opportunity to study the body and bring fundamental body perceptions into focus. We will learn about the body with the goal of being able to sense basic information about the body and its parts. Think bones, skin, eyes and breath. When we can refine and differentiate our perception of our skeleton, it helps to free more parts of our body to move. Visual perception leads to understanding the different ways we can use our sense of attention. The breath is basic to the way we individually organize our movement. Understanding the body deepens our capacity to be present on stage, on the field or court and in day to day life. A final project will enable students to share their anatomical knowledge in a creative performance. The class will attempt to personalize the concepts of anatomy.
CREDIT AREA: CA-PA or PE (term)

Dance - Intermediate/Advanced Level

Aerial Dance and Improvisation
This class will explore the idea of improvisation on the floor and in the air at different locations. We will explore principles of spontaneous creation in both movement and sound, working to consciously and collaboratively create a vibrant ensemble of dancers. On Tuesdays we will work with Rebecca Drake (CFS '92) and expand on the principles of aerial dance by exploring movement with the silk fabric rigs. On Thursdays we will build on these explorations and refine basic principles and skills through creating and dancing improvisational scores. We will practice paying attention to our own body, other bodies and the space around us. The idea of site-specific dance will be introduced. Technical explorations will focus on integrated body movement and strength development. We will share our work with the community throughout the term in formal and informal ways. Dancers are encouraged to take this class more than once to refine their practice.Permission of the Instructor is required; class size is limited to 12-14.
CREDIT: CA-PA or PE (term)

Modern Dance: Collaboration & Performance
Prerequisite: Consistent Dance experience in the US or permission of Instructor
This class will emphasize the body in motion and the technique of modern dance. Students will work collaboratively on a dance inspired by last year’s dancers. Dancers will be asked to contribute and learn dance phrases in the process. There will be a specific emphasis on the relationship between technical and creative development. STUDENTS NEED TO TAKE THIS CLASS FOR BOTH THE FALL AND WINTER TERMS BECAUSE THE MATERIAL IS CUMULATIVE. There will be outside rehearsals initially on Monday afternoons and then on Thursday afternoons in December until the concert sharing. After winter break, dancers will have the opportunity to choreograph and collaborate with a guest artist during the last third of the term. Students are limited to 3 excused absences for course credit. 
CREDIT: CA-PA or PE (two terms)

Dance Composition
This process-oriented class will have a joyful lab like atmosphere where experimentation is valued.  We will work with visual art, music, photography, props and text as tools to use for generating ideas, movement and choreography. Through a refined series of in class assignments you will delve deeply into your own creative process and share your findings with the group. The idea is to come at choreography from many angles, to create and view multiple studies, and to try compositional ideas that open up the sense of what dance can be and what dance can communicate. Dancers will be asked to create a final concept piece that builds on the material we have covered in class. 
CREDIT: CA-PA or PE (term) 

Dance - Advanced Level

Advanced Dance: Collaboration & Performance
Prerequisite: Modern Dance or Advanced Dance & Permission of Instructor
Students will work collaboratively to develop work thematically related to a theme chosen by last year’s participants. The theme will be explored in dance, poetry and video. Dancers participating in this project will need to do in depth research during the summer months and generate dance phrases. All dancers will meet in August with the instructor, videographer and other artists where their findings will shape the direction of the concert. Students will explore motivations for selecting movement around the stated theme. The concert will be on continuous thought that invites audience engagement in a particular way. There will be opportunities for dancers to design small portions of this collaborative work based on their research. This process requires a high level of commitment and self-direction. After school rehearsals on Monday afternoons will be required until winter break. There will be a sharing of work towards the end October. STUDENTS NEED TO TAKE ADVANCED DANCE IN BOTH THE FALL AND WINTER TERMS BECAUSE THE MATERIAL IS CUMULATIVE. After winter break students will have the opportunity to work with a guest artist during the last third of the term. Students are limited to 3 excused absences for credit. 
CREDIT: CA-PA or PE (two terms)

Visual Arts (CA-VA)
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 8 credits required: 2 in visual arts (CA-VA), 2 in performing arts (CA-PA), remaining 4 in either discipline.

 

Ceramics
The class includes an introduction to clay for both vessels and sculpture (including slipping and scoring, hand-building, using the slab roller, wheel, kiln firing and glazes). Once foundation techniques are introduced, projects may explore abstraction of forms, structure and construction, function, figures and work in a series. Students will also have the opportunity to view and discuss modern and contemporary artists working with clay materials, and will be asked to participate in group critiques in class.
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Design in Action 
This class introduces the elements and principles of design to students through projects in a variety of media. Framed by the Design Thinking process as developed by Stanford’s Design School, students will gain a rich arts vocabulary, and make use of color theory, elements and principles of design and composition.   Another goal for the class is helping students learn how to work as a design team to create, develop, and critique ideas. After introductory experiments, students are asked to apply what they’ve learned by working with projects. Over the course of the term, students will engage as a ‘hireable’ studio of designers available to create posters and promotional materials for CFS clubs, events and activities.  We will aim to create design work that’s engaging, memorable, and effective at moving the viewer toward action. 
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Digital Art
Digital art is an artistic work or practice that uses digital technology as an essential part of the creative or presentation process.  Students will gain experience working with photo-manipulation and editing software, as well as learning more about how to paint using a digital screen.  Depending on the leanings of the students, projects may include poster design, illustration, installation and projection, manipulated scanned images, digital collage, sound/music art, animation/gifs, and interactive performances. 
CREDIT:  CA-VA (term)

Drawing & Painting
This class exposes students to a variety of two-dimensional media, through practicing techniques necessary for developing drawing and painting skills. The class focuses on using design, color theory and composition principles in 2-D artwork, and applies them to projects that encourage students to draw what they see and feel, and to visually share their ideas and visions of the world. The first part of the term will focus primarily on drawing through still life, portraiture and life drawing, landscapes, and storytelling, and the second part of the term will be spent learning color theory  applying these experiences to extended conceptual projects in wet media.  Critiques throughout the term will allow students to gain feedback from their peers and instructor and gain confidence with their arts vocabulary and understanding of idea, form, idiom, structure, craft and surface/impact. Students will work with graphite, pen and ink, charcoal, china marker, chalk and oil pastels, colored pencils, watercolor, gouache and acrylic paint. 
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

MakerLab: 3D Design and Fabrication
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 or permission of instructor
This hands-on course will focus on the tools and techniques required for computer-aided fabrication of 3D objects.  We’ll take an overview of additive and subtractive machining and then focus primarily on the processes involved in 3D printing and scanning. Students will explore different software options for generating 3D designs and take an in-depth look at the opportunities and constraints of designing for 3D printing.

This class will be computer-intensive, requiring students to learn the basics of several different software platforms and create simple printable designs from each.  We will spend the last part of the term designing and producing original objects that can be either functional or artistic in nature.  For this project, students will choose which software they’d like to learn in more depth.
CREDIT: CA-VA or ER (term)

Mixed Media
This is primarily a 3D course in which students will begin the term engaging in workshops that introduce basics of construction, manipulation, and assemblage. We will focus on how different materials translate into meaning, depending on construction, composition and use of color theory. We will learn the basics of yarn and fiber arts as well as working with paper and found and reusable materials- then bring them to life through a variety of projects. We'll also focus on a variety of attachment processes, including sewing, gluing, binding, and wrapping. 
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Photography
This class begins with a history of photography, including 35mm black and white photography, learning about cameras, film, and darkroom techniques. The students will be in the darkroom for much of the term, as well as using phones and digital cameras to develop skills in composition, art making and storytelling.  All will participate in critiques and share feedback throughout the term. Chemistry and darkroom safety will be covered along with responsible darkroom set up and clean up.  Students must provide their own cameras or make arrangements ahead of time to be sure one is available for their use during the term (we do have a number of school film cameras available). A materials fee will be charged for this class. 
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Printmaking Techniques
The variety of printmaking processes available are broad, and can produce unexpected and powerful, unique imagery. In this class, students will combine drawing exercises with carving and printing processes such as: Reduction Prints, Stamps, Foam and Linoleum Printing, Spray Painted Stencils, and Screen Printing. We’ll also learn about some of the pioneers and contemporary artists that use these processes as we make work of our own. 
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Portfolio
This class is for juniors and seniors only (or by portfolio application if a first or second year), and is a studio class focusing on building and presenting a portfolio of work.  Students will sign up for both terms of this fall and winter class and work during the fall term to develop skills in a wide variety of materials through advanced art experiments, then have the winter term to work independently to solidify their visual voice and compile their portfolios.  Near the transition between fall and winter terms, students will attend (as part of the course curriculum), a National Portfolio Day event  in Charlotte, Richmond, or Washington, DC. National Portfolio Days are meant as opportunities for high school students to present a body of their work to a variety of Art Schools from all over the US and abroad. Being self-motivated and focused is of the utmost importance, as this class offers a lot of studio time to work on individual projects, but aiming to attend an art school or study art after CFS is not a prerequisite.  Students may not sign up for winter term without being enrolled in the fall term. 
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Independent Art Projects
This class is designed for students who have experience in the arts studio and who have a vision of a project (or series of projects) they would like to work on with minimal direction. This might be an opportunity for a student to spend more time in the darkroom developing film or using the ceramics wheel for more focused periods of time.   There is a thorough application process in order to receive credit for this experience.
CREDIT: CA-VA (term) 

 

ENRICHMENT (ER)
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We offer term-long enrichment courses in a variety of subject areas. 

American Sign Language I
 The first trimester of beginner ASL concentrates on vocabulary, simple sentence structure, and learning visual cues of lip formation, facial expression, hand positioning, repetitive motion and body language. The second trimester explores the more complex sentence structures of ASL syntax. The final trimester will focus on interpreting songs and stories along with everyday conversational skills.  Beginning ASL class is characterized by a relaxed setting and progress according to the learning level of the students.
CREDIT: ER (year)

American Sign Language II
Prerequisite: ASL I
Second year ASL students will continue to add to their vocabulary as well as work on hand, expression and mouth coordination. Simulated interpreter situations will be set up to give the students hands-on experience with ASL interpretation. Conversational skills will be honed and the majority of class communication will be simultaneously signed and spoken. The class will also help design a model ASL beginner course, equipping those completing the course with tools to become teachers, themselves.
CREDIT: ER (year)

Car Maintenance
This car maintenance class offers instruction in three areas: 1) gaining familiarity with the various systems on a motor vehicle (brakes, cooling, electrical, etc.); 2) performing basic maintenance on motor vehicles, and 3) acquiring a more comprehensive understanding of how vehicles actually perform and react to various road conditions and driver inputs (accelerating, braking, and turning). Our discussions will go into these topics in a little more detail than that of a typical Driver’s Education program. We will learn both from the textbook and from hands-on exercises and maintenance work done on actual cars… so be prepared for both. Sign-up priority will be given to students who are already driving.
CREDIT: ER (term)

Introduction to Computer Programming  
Prerequisite: completion of Algebra 2 or permission of the instructor
This course is intended for students who have done little or no computer programming.  Specific languages may vary, but generally students first learn HTML for making web pages and then move to Python for general programming.  The goal is to become comfortable using variables, conditional statements, loops and subroutines.  The power of top-level modular design and “stubbing” to facilitate effective testing will be introduced.  Students who have completed Algebra 2 will be most comfortable in this class.  Other students should talk to the instructor before signing up.
CREDIT: ER (term)

History through Film
This class is theme-based (prior examples= Film Noir, Westerns, Cold War, etc.). We will watch a chronological sequence of films centered on the theme; students are required simply to write a response for each film.
CREDIT: ER (term)

MakerLab: 3D Design and Fabrication
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 or permission of instructor
This hands-on course will focus on the tools and techniques required for computer-aided fabrication of 3D objects.  We’ll take an overview of additive and subtractive machining and then focus primarily on the processes involved in 3D printing and scanning. Students will explore different software options for generating 3D designs and take an in-depth look at the opportunities and constraints of designing for 3D printing.

This class will be computer-intensive, requiring students to learn the basics of several different software platforms and create simple printable designs from each.  We will spend the last part of the term designing and producing original objects that can be either functional or artistic in nature.  For this project, students will choose which software they’d like to learn in more depth.
CREDIT: CA-VA or ER (term)

MakerLab: Advanced Tools and Techniques
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and at least one MakerLab course
This hands-on course will focus on advanced tools and techniques used in computer-aided fabrication of objects. We’ll review additive, subtractive and other types of computer controlled machining, gaining an appreciation for the strengths and weaknesses of each. Some time will be spent on 3D printing, and then we’ll branch out to other CNC (computer numerical control) machines such as a laser cutter/engraver and a CNC mill.

This class will be computer-intensive. Students will explore different software options for generating 2D & 3D designs and take an in-depth look at the opportunities and constraints of designing for different fabrication methods. In addition to learning how to use lightweight CAD (computer aided design) and CAM (computer aided machining) programs, students will learn how to properly operate and care for the CNC machines.

The last month of the term will be spent designing and producing an original project using techniques learned in this class and previous MakerLab courses. For example, a student who previously completed the Microcontrollers course may elect to use an Arduino board to incorporate interactive features into the final project. 
CREDIT: ER (term)

Public Speaking
Over the course of this term, students will learn the fundamentals of public speaking and explore various styles of presentations, from debate to storytelling and many in between. Weekly practices will culminate in a final presentation in a style and on a topic of each student's choice.
CREDIT: ER or CA-PA (term)

Research Workshop: Independent Learning, Team Spirit

Is there a topic or subject you wish you could learn more about? Perhaps a personal interest that hasn’t been covered in your classes, or something you heard about but wish you could explore more deeply -- if only you had the time, guidance, and/or knowledge of where to start? In this course, students will select a topic of their choice for research, but we will develop and support each other’s learning journeys along the way. Class meetings will allow time for individual work as well as collaborative sharing and constructive critique. There will also be time allotted for developing technology skills, if so desired.
CREDIT: ER (term)

Topics in Psychology I: The Brain, Perception, and Learning 
Open to grades 10-12
This term-long course is NOT a survey of Psychology, but rather focuses specifically on biopsychology (or cognitive psychology). We will explore the neurology of the brain, our senses (specifically vision and hearing) and determine how these form the foundation for (and shape our) learning and memory. Students may take one, two, or all three terms of this course. Open to grades 10-12.
CREDIT: SS or ER(term)

Topics in Psychology II: Human Development, Personality, and Socialization 
Open to grades 10-12
This term-long course is NOT a survey of Psychology, but rather focuses specifically on social psychology. We will explore how we develop through each phase of our lives and delve into specific aspects of our selves such as our gender and sexuality, our personality--what makes us “tick”!  Students may take one, two, or all three terms of this course. Open to grades 10-12.
CREDIT: SS or ER (term)

Topics in Psychology III: Psychological Health, Disorders, and Therapies 
Open to grades 10-12
This term-long course is NOT a survey of Psychology, but rather focuses specifically on psychological disorders. Not only will we explore our emotions and how we express them, we will also delve into stress, its impacts on our health, and specific disorders and their treatments. Students may take one, two, or all three terms of this course. Open to grades 10-12.
CREDIT: SS or ER (term)

Upper School Newspaper
This is a project based class, open to 9th through 12th graders, in which we create and produce a student newspaper. The specific nature of this publication will be determined by members of the class. Whether we decide on sassy and parodic, serious and thoughtful, or some combination thereof, we will review media ethics and the role of news reporting in our society, including some historic highs and lows. Students will learn how to gather background material and check facts, how to conduct an interview, how to write news, feature stories, and effective headlines, and how to design and lay out a news publication. We will produce several issues of the paper in both print and online formats.
CREDIT: CS or ER (term)

 

HEALTH  & HUMAN SEXUALITY (HS)
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"Friends view sexuality as a Divine gift. It is the source of human life and a part of our identity and self-understanding. At Carolina Friends School (CFS) we want students to understand sexual intercourse as a profound expression of love at its deepest, most caring, and responsible level. Teenagers who wait to experience intercourse in a loving, committed relationship will gain the greatest appreciation for this gift. We encourage our students to abstain from sexual intercourse until they grow into such a relationship. We ask CFS families to join us in sharing this message with our students." From Carolina Friends School Sexuality Education Policy, April 24, 1992

Each student must complete one credit in Health for graduation.

Adolescent Health
Required for all students except freshmen (who will satisfy the Adolescent Health requirement though CFS Life)

Adolescent Health is a topical exploration of health issues especially important to teenagers. The information is vital in preparing students to make safe and healthy decisions about their present and future lives.  Students will focus on four main areas:  wellness and self care, mental health, sexual health and drug education.  Students will have a great deal of input in reference to the topics we cover in depth.
CREDIT: HS (term)

 CFS Life
This two-term class is required for all freshmen.
The transition into upper school is one of excitement as well as trepidation.  It is a unique point in a young person's life.  It is a time of varying emotional, social, physical  and intellectual growth.  Carolina Friends School not only wants to name this transition but address it by providing a class for all 9th graders which focuses on these timely issues. The goal of CFS Life class is to ease the transition into upper school as well as address the health issues teens face as they move toward adulthood.  Major areas addressed are Upper School orientation, Quaker philosophy, study skills, mental health, spiritual health, wellness and self care, sexual health, and drug education.  The course will be co-taught by CFS staff.  (Upper-class students will act as mentors and student liaisons, receiving credit for this service).
CREDIT: 1 HS, 1 ER (two terms)

Senior Life
Prerequisite: Senior standing
So, you've almost graduated from CFS. You have just one more trimester to complete. This class is about preparing you for college life. The class will open with the questions: what is on your mind, what are your worries, what are you excited about, what would be helpful to know? We will bring alumni in to share experiences, offer suggestions and drop some hints. You will conduct research on the college of your choice. Do you know where the learning resource center is? Do you know where the office for international travel is? Do you want to join an organization? Do you know where the counseling center is and what services they provide? Next we will cover some issues many college freshmen face: budget and financial stability, time management, study skills, roommate conflict resolution, peer pressure, alcohol and drug use, and sexual safety, conduct, choice, consent and refusal. Students will have a great deal of input on what we discuss and study.
CREDIT: HS (term)

  

LANGUAGE ARTS (LA)
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Students are required to take one Language Arts class for each term they are enrolled at Carolina Friends School. Twelve credits are required to graduate (4 years). Classes are structured by level. In addition to these year-long required courses, there are several elective offerings.

Foundations of Literature
Required for all freshmen
This year long course is designed to provide an introduction to literary analysis, a space to explore your own relationship with literature, an opportunity to develop your reading and writing skills, and a place for deeper reflection about your relationship with the natural world. In the first term, we will inquire into how water functions as a symbol, as a metaphor, and as an encounter with your environment. In the second and third terms, we will focus on the themes of land and growth. Throughout this class, you will be asked to understand how others have explored their relationships with the environment and their changing worlds, and to clarify and intensify your own ability to explain that relationship. By linking this course thematically to your Geography and Biology courses, you will gain a comprehensive environmental studies curriculum from which to grapple with these issues, bridging the perspectives of the humanities, the natural sciences and the social sciences. Keeping one eye on your End-of-Year of Experience in Newton Grove, we will look for ways to connect the experiences of those about whom we read with your own interactions in an ever-changing world. 
CREDIT: LA (year - required)

Global Literature 
Required for all sophomores
Building from the questions that arise during the 9th grade End-of-Year Experience in Newton Grove, NC, this year long sophomore level course uses literature to understand the relationship between identity and meaning. Students will read examples of literature that reveal different ways to make meaning in and of the world through their use of symbolism, form and content, with a stress on literature from the non-European world. But rather than just survey different cultural worldviews as represented in exemplary texts, students will be asked to examine the ways in which the literature they read raises questions about the possible commensurability of different systems of meaning in order to understand more fully how people can make meaning across lines of perceived difference. By the end of the course, students will be better equipped to identify the ways in which one’s identity contributes to how one understands the world, as well as the conditions of possibility for stepping outside of one’s own worldview and into that of another. Because this course will be linked to the sophomore Global History course, students will be able to understand this relationship between identity and meaning within the context of globalization, both in historical and contemporary ways. Not only will students utilize literature to understand the process of globalization and how people make globalization meaningful, but students will also examine the ways in which literature itself can be a “global” cultural product. Ultimately, students will gain a deepened understanding of what culture means and the complexity of its representation. Students will refine their critical reading skills through regular reading assignments as well as improve their ability to write evidence-based, analytical essays by using the revision process to sharpen their written argumentation.
CREDIT: LA (year - required) 

American Literature   
Juniors only

Hawthorne, Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Whitman, Dickinson, Cather, Twain, Fitzgerald, Baldwin,  Hansberry, Steinbeck, Hughes, Hemingway, Hurston, Wright, Faulkner, Stevens, Frost, Salinger, Updike, Doctorow, Mailer, DeLillo, Walker, McCarthy, Roth, Morrison, Kingsolver, Franzen, Pyncheon -- during its two-plus centuries of existence, our country has produced a vast and varied treasure house of literature. In this year-long seminar class, we will choose our authors from this rich array. Through novels, essays, stories, plays and poems, we will explore what is unique about the American consciousness, how it was formed, and where it’s heading.  Students will work toward proficiency in analyzing literary works and expressing their ideas in clear, thoughtful prose.

CREDIT: LA (year)

Literature of the Modern World
Juniors and seniors only
 How did the world’s current inequalities and injustices come to be? And how do you find your own identity in this world? In this student-led, inquiry-based course, we will explore the underpinnings of identity in a global context. The course will be structured using an “Understanding by Design” model wherein self-organized groups of students can decide which themes to pursue based on their own interests. In September, we will begin our journey with Leslie Marmon Silko’s Ceremony. After an exploration of the themes of identity, war, poverty, environment, race, gender, colonialism, and narrative, students will self-organize into clusters and decide which thematic directions and texts to explore. Course instructors will help students design their curriculum and choose literary works that will enrich their inquiries.
CREDIT: LA (year)

Meaning and Representation in the Modern World: Literature since Columbus
Seniors only
This year-long, advanced humanities course will provide students a way to understand how meaning and its representations has shaped—and been shaped by—historical and geographical changes brought forth since 1492. Since then, the divide between the Global North and the Global South has coalesced around an idea of modernity, while colonial relationships have served as a large factor in shaping cultures, economies, environments, histories, politics, and societies across that divide for the last 500+ years. This course will use major aesthetic and philosophical movements from the Caribbean, continental America, South Asia, sub-Saharan Africa and Western Europe in order to study meaning and its representations within that context of modernity. Students enrolling in this course should expect to complete nightly reading assignments, regular short writing assignments and longer, analytical essays as well as independent research on the course topics. The course will bring students to the contemporary postmodern/postcolonial moment in order to ask: so what does the world mean now (and how should we act in it)?
CREDIT: LA (year)

Language Arts Electives

Banned Books  

This course will explore books that have been deemed “unacceptable” by various entities, ranging from governmental bans to school policies. Students will read and discuss a variety of texts, including the books themselves as well as articles and arguments surrounding the censorship of literature. Students will also be expected to write assignments of varying lengths, styles, and topics throughout the term.
CREDIT: LA (term)

Book to Film
Do you ever wonder how the ideas for some films originated? Do you often wish that the film version of your favorite book lived up to the storyline of the original novel? In this course, we will look at how some iconic films developed from book versions and how they have changed over time. We will be using the term “book” respectively, as some films have arisen from short stories, graphic novels, and even songs! Therefore, our mission will be to analyze the role of narrative, generally, in creating alternate media formats. We will do so with an eye toward changing stories into imaginative visual mediums.
CREDIT: LA (term) 

Creative Writing
Our species loves lies. Ever since our earliest ancestors gathered around the fire to listen spellbound to tales spun by the imagination, humans have had an insatiable thirst for this kind of entertainment -- and once writing was developed, we could even be lied to by people who were already dead! This course offers students the opportunity to practice various forms of creative writing and the option to share their work with the class. We use structured exercises as a springboard to free writing, while taking a look at some excerpts from classic works to answer the question “How did they do that?” In the process, we’ll find that this brand of lying is actually a supercharged form of truth.
CREDIT: LA (term)

The Immigration Experience
Many of us have ancestors who recently left their homes in Central or South America, Africa, Asia, or Europe to make a new life for them and their children in the United States.  What brought them here?  How did they adapt to a new country, culture, and language? In the process of becoming U.S. citizens, what did they retain or lose from their past?  This class will examine the immigration experience through fiction and oral history.  

You will read two books over the term.  The first, The Fortunate Pilgrim by Mario Puzo, follows the lives of an Italian immigrant family around the turn of the 20th century. This gripping novel will bring to life the immigrant experience, providing a historical account to compare and contrast with our present day readings.  The second book we’ll explore is Underground America: Narratives of Undocumented Lives, which chronicles the lives of 24 undocumented immigrants navigating the uncertain landscapes of the United States. Through these fascinating, provocative oral testimonies we will gain a greater awareness of an unappreciated and often reviled segment of our population.

The hope of this class is to broaden our knowledge of immigration and its root causes, the history of immigration to the U.S., legislative responses, the human side of the process in both sending and receiving countries, and finally how these factors shape and influence our perspectives in the present. As a class we want to move from sympathy, where we entertain a level of compassion, to an empathic standpoint that allows for greater understanding and in turn respect.
CREDIT: SS or LA (term) 

Philosophy I: Thales to Thomas Aquinas
In this class, we will look at the development of Western Philosophy from the Ancient Greeks through the Middle Ages.   We will ask such questions as:  How do we understand the world outside us?  How do we know what is right and wrong?  How do we decide what is beautiful?  Is there a higher force in the universe?  We will spend some time comparing Western philosophy to non-Western ways of looking at the world. You do not need to take Philosophy II to take this class.
CREDIT: SS or LA (term)

Philosophy II: Descartes to Nietzsche
This class will go on to look at Western philosophy in the Modern world, continuing with the fundamental questions we asked in the first term.  We will especially look at how history in the 19th century is critically important for defining who we are.  The term will primarily focus on the works of Descartes, Kant, Marx, and Nietzsche. It would be helpful, but not necessary, to have taken Philosophy I.
CREDIT: SS or LA (term)

Playwriting
This class teaches students the fundamentals of dramatic structure and character development, as well as introducing a vocabulary for theatrical performance. We will work daily on creative writing exercises that help the playwright craft intelligent and engaging theater. Our goal is to write a short one act play. Successful pieces will be considered for inclusion in the following year’s Winter One Act play festival.
CREDIT: LA or CA-PA (term)

Russian Literature Survey 
This course will introduce students to Russian literature through the lenses of history, culture, and language. We will read a variety of literary texts as a class, and students will read one of several novels in groups, presenting their group's novel to the class at the end of the term. Students will also learn to read and write in Cyrillic, as well as learn basic Russian phrases and vocabulary. Russian culture and history will be explored through selected readings, multimedia, and culinary adventures.
CREDIT: LA (term)

What is Art?
This course will investigate theories by artists over the decades who have sought to determine what components make good visual, performance, written, or musical pieces. Accordingly, we will read, view, and analyze various mediums of imaginative work and explore their compositions. We also will consider in great depth artists’ views about the production of art. This course is meant to be experiential in its nature such that we will enjoy the art we are examining.
CREDIT: LA (term)

 

MATHEMATICS (MA)
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Students are required to complete three year-long mathematics courses during their four years of US. Most students will find it to their advantage to take four year-long mathematics courses during their US career. The particular courses will vary depending on the strengths and inclinations of the individual student. Students may enhance their mathematics experience with term-long elective courses.

Calculator note: The math department requires each student to have a graphing calculator. Currently, the Texas Instruments TI-84© is being used at CFS.

Math 100 (Algebra 1)
This course is open to incoming US students depending on their mathematics background. It will cover the same topics as Math 105, but will develop the topics at a slower pace and in less depth than Math 105.
Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year )

Math 105 (Algebra 1)
This course is open to freshmen on the recommendation of their MS teachers. Topics include:

  • ●       Review of arithmetic operations
  • ●       Ratios
  • ●       Linear equations and inequalities
  • ●       Systems of linear equations and inequalities
  • ●       Exponents
  • ●       Square roots
  • ●       Polynomial expressions
  • ●       Introduction to quadratic equations

Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Math 205 (Geometry)
This course is open to students who have been successful in Math 100 or Math 105. It is not open to freshmen. This course will cover the same basic topics as Math 210, but from an inductive and empirical approach, rather than a theoretical and deductive approach. There will also be an emphasis on numerical computation and algebraic methods.
Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Math 210 (Geometry)
This course is designed for students who were successful in Math 105. Students who were highly successful in Math 100 may enroll with instructor permission. Freshmen may enroll in this class on the recommendation of their Middle School teachers. The objects studied include lines and angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, general and regular polygons, circles and solid figures. Topics of study include constructions with straight edge and compass, measurement (angular, linear, area and volume), congruency, similarity and proofs. There is also an introduction to right triangle Trigonometry. Geometer’s Sketchpad or similar software is used when appropriate, on the school’s computers.
TEXT: Elementary Geometry for College Students, 3rd ed. by Alexander and Koeberlein (0-618-22176-X) and instructor's handouts.
CREDIT: MA (year)

Math 310 (Algebra 2 and Trigonometry)
This course is open to students who have completed Math 205 or Math 210. It is not open to ninth graders. This course will cover the same basic topics as Math 320, but it will develop the topics at a slower pace and to less depth, and will prepare students for Functions and Modeling. This course is not intended as preparatory background for Precalculus, but students who are highly successful may, after consulting with their instructor, consider Precalculus instead of Functions and Modeling.
TEXT: Intermediate Algebra, 4th ed. by Larson (0-618-38826-5) and instructor's handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Math 320 (Algebra 2 and Trigonometry)
This course is designed for students who were successful in MA210. Students who were highly successful in MA205 could consider this course, but only with instructor permission. Freshmen who have worked at an advanced level during their MS careers are also eligible, but only on the recommendation of their MS teachers. 

Students who are successful in this course should consider enrolling in Precalculus, after consulting with the instructor. Function and Modeling is also available as a next math course.

Topics include:

  • ●       Rational Expressions: Factoring, Simplifying and Operations
  • ●       Absolute Value Equations
  • ●       Introduction to Functions
  • ●       Linear Equation Review
  • ●       Quadratic Equations
  • ●       Complex Numbers
  • ●       Conic Sections
  • ●       Introduction to Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
  • ●       Right Angle Trigonometry
  • ●       Unit Circle Trigonometry
  • ●       Graphing Trigonometric Functions

TEXT: Intermediate Algebra, 4th ed. by Larson (0-618-38826-5) and Trigonometry: A Graphing Approach by Larson (0-618-39458-3) and Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Introduction to Statistics
This course is open to students who have successfully completed Math at the 300-level. This course will cover the same basic topics as Statistics, but it will develop the topics at a slower pace and to less depth than Statistics. Students who take this class will not be eligible to take Statistics in subsequent years.

TEXT: Statistics: The Art and Science of Learning from Data, 2nd ed. by Agresti, Adam and Franklin (0135131995) and Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Statistics
This course is open to students who have successfully completed Math at the 300-level. Students should consult with the instructor before registering for this class.

  • ●       Exploring Data with Graphs and Numerical Summaries
  • ●       Designing Experiments
  • ●       Probability
  • ●       Binomial, Normal and Sampling Distributions
  • ●       Statistical Inferences
  • ●       Hypothesis Testing

 

TEXT: Statistics: The Art and Science of Learning from Data, 2nd ed. by Agresti, Adam and Franklin (0135131995) and Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Functions and Modeling
This course is open to students who have successfully completed Math 320 or Math 310. This course will cover the same basic topics as Precalculus, but it will develop the topics at a slower pace and to less depth than Precalculus. This course is not intended as preparatory background for Precalculus or for Calculus.
TEXT: Precalculus, 4th ed. by Blitzer (0-321-55984-7) and Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Precalculus
This course is intended for students who have been successful in Math 320. Students who were highly successful in MA310 could consider this course as well. All students should consult with the instructor before registering for this class. 

  • ●       Review of Functions and Graphs
  • ●       Polynomial and Rational Functions
  • ●       Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
  • ●       Analytic Trigonometry
  • ●       Sequences, Series and Induction
  • ●       Introduction to Limits

TEXT: Precalculus, 4th ed. by Blitzer (0-321-55984-7) and Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Calculus
This course is open to students who have been successful in Precalculus. All students should consult with the instructor before registering for this class.

  • ●       Limits
  • ●       Derivatives
  • ●       Euler’s Method
  • ●       Integrals
  • ●       Differential Equations
  • ●       Applications

TEXT: Calculus of a Single Variable, 8th ed. by Larson, Hostetler and Edwards (0-618-50304-8) and Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Calculus Lab
This term-long course, offered in the Spring, provides students concurrently enrolled in Calculus with in-depth preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in Calculus (AB). Students should consult with the instructor before registering for this class.
CREDIT: MA (term)

Calculus 2
This course is open to students who have successfully completed Calculus. The study of Calculus will be continued (Infinite Series, Polar Coordinates, Further Applications) and introductions to various other fields of advanced mathematics will be offered. 
TEXT: Calculus of a Single Variable, 8th ed. by Larson, Hostetler and Edwards (0-618-50304-8); Calculus, 5th ed. By Hughes-Hallet, et al (978-0470-13159-6) and Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

 

MODERN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (FL)
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Students are required to take six FL courses (2 years) to graduate (the admission requirement for the schools in the University of North Carolina college system is for two years of the same foreign language). All Foreign Language courses are year-long classes (3 credits per year).

French


French I
The French 1 program takes students through a variety of basic contexts such as friends, family, leisure-time activities, academics, etc; verb forms are primarily limited to the present tense. Frequent paired speaking exercises and various audio and video clips allow students to practice and develop confidence in their listening and speaking ability. Students are introduced to francophone culture and history through videos, cultural notes and class discussions.
CREDIT: FL (year)

Intermediate French
Prerequisite: French 1.
The program builds on previous contexts and constructions, including forms and uses of the imperfect and the passé composé. Various combinations of paired exercises, short listening and speaking activities from the classroom CD set, and frequent audio and video clips provide opportunities for students to express themselves verbally in short exchanges on a daily basis. Students will be expected to do written work on a daily basis, and give periodic oral presentations based on the theme of the particular unit we're covering (household chores, weekend activities, nature, etc.). The course includes review of the basics of French grammar and structure, and exposure to advanced forms such as the subjunctive, the future and the conditional; history and cultural studies go deeper and broader than in previous levels, asking students to not only integrate the material, but the linguistic forms as well.
CREDIT: FL (year)

Advanced French
Prerequisite: Intermediate French
This offering is designed for students who have progressed beyond the introductory levels, or who come into the US with bilingual or strong French language skills. Emphasis is on refining the student’s control of the forms and structure of the language, and on adding nuance and precision to their writing and oral expression. Readings often include one or two full-length contemporary novels (what junior high school students and young adults are currently reading in France). Ability and willingness to interact in the target language is a must at this level.
CREDIT: FL (year)


SPANISH

Spanish I
In this course students will develop a firm foundation in Spanish grammar which will enable them to master basic comprehension, reading, writing, and speaking skills. There is a strong emphasis on vocabulary memorization and on verb conjugations. The class is conducted increasingly in Spanish. Regular quizzes, chapter tests, and a final exam will be given.
CREDIT: FL (year)

Spanish II
This course is a continuation of Spanish I. Second-year Spanish is an intensive study in grammar and verb tenses. Students will expand on reading, writing, comprehension, and speaking skills. The class will be conducted primarily in Spanish. Regular quizzes, chapter tests, and a final exam will be given.
CREDIT: FL (year)
PREREQUISITE: Spanish I

Spanish III
This course will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will continue to focus on Spanish grammar, reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and give oral interviews and presentations in Spanish. Regular chapter tests and a final exam will be given.
CREDIT: FL (year)
PREREQUISITE: Spanish II

Spanish IV
This advanced-level class will be conducted entirely in Spanish. There will be an emphasis on in class discussions and class participation. The class will include advanced grammar, and Spanish and Latin American literature and music. Students will be expected to read literature and write analytical essays and papers as well as creative works in Spanish. An addition to the writings, tests and oral presentations will be used to evaluate students.
CREDIT: FL  (year)
PREREQUISITE: Spanish III

Advanced Spanish
This course is an advanced-level class that will be conducted entirely in Spanish. There will be an emphasis on discussion. The class will include advanced grammar picking up where Spanish IV left off. There will be a focus on Spanish and Latin American short stories, short novels compositions, dramatic work, and poetry. Students will be required to write one longer essay per term as well as shorter pieces both creative and analytical. There will be essays, tests, and oral presentations. 
CREDIT: FL (year)
PREREQUISITE: Spanish IV

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PE)
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Students are required to take six total PE classes (2 full years) to graduate. Unless otherwise noted, all PE courses are term long. When a student completes a season on an Upper School Interscholastic Sports Team, he/she receives one PE credit.

Dance classes may be taken for either Cultural Arts or Physical Education credit. Descriptions of these classes are found under Cultural Arts.

Advanced Dance: Collaboration & Performance (see Cultural Arts)

Aerial Dance and Improvisation Collaboration
(see Cultural Arts)

Contemporary Dance Styles (see Cultural Arts)

Dance Composition (see Cultural Arts)

Dance: Shaping an Impulse
(see Cultural Arts)

Experiential Anatomy for Dancers and Athletes (see Cultural Arts)

Modern Dance: Collaboration & Performance (see Cultural Arts)


Interscholastic Sports Teams
Students receive one PE credit for each term of an interscholastic sport.

Fall - Soccer (boys); Volleyball (girls); Tennis (girls); Cross-Country Running (co-ed)
Winter - Basketball (boys and girls); Ultimate Frisbee (co-ed); Swimming (boys and girls)
Spring – Baseball (boys), Soccer (girls); Track and Field (boys and girls), Ultimate Frisbee (co-ed); Tennis (boys)

 

Other Physical Education Courses
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Bowling
We bowl at Mardi Gras Lanes in Durham; no prior experience required. Fee required (about $8 for each session).
CREDIT: PE (term)

Soccer Class

This class is designed to give the students an opportunity to receive a good workout from playing soccer in the gymnasium. A futsal ball is used, which is smaller and heavier than a regulation size soccer ball; this is more conducive to indoor play. The class provides the right balance of fun and intensity.
CREDIT: PE (term)

Swimming
This class provides two of the training sessions for the swim team. Students travel on a CFS bus to the Triangle SportsPlex (Hillsborough). The actual in-the-water training time is 2:20 or so to 3:45. Students on the swim team are also expected to attend two additional afterschool training sessions on Mondays and Wednesdays from 3:35 to 4:45.
CREDIT: PE (term)

Teams
Girls and Boys Soccer,  Girls and Boys Tennis, Girls and Boys’ Basketball, Cross Country, Ultimate, Swimming, Track and Field, Girls Volleyball, Boys Baseball. Track and Field

Tennis Class
In this class we will concentrate on absorbing the basics of tennis within an atmosphere of entertaining instruction and fun. Emphasis will be on having fun while developing our skills. Students will learn proper grips, stroke mechanics, movement and positioning, along with the esoteric scoring system. Interspersed throughout the class we will play a variety of games that will enable students to practice their skills in enjoyable and engaging ways.
CREDIT: PE (term)

Walking and Talking
In this PE class, we will walk the paths around campus and through the local communities.  We will walk the well-marked paths of Duke Forest, but we will also get out and explore some new places.  While we are walking, we will have an opportunity to get to know each other better. All are welcome.
CREDIT: PE (term)

Weight Lifting
This class is designed for students to gain a greater understanding of the proper techniques, methods and training regiments that make for a successful workout experience. We will explore multiple training programs, a myriad of effective movements/exercises that target all the muscle groups, plyometrics and cardio possibilities, along with a valuable stretching program. Students will be asked to keep a folder in order to house all their daily workout logs. These will enable us to chart our progress through the trimester. Workout sessions will invariably be structured, with students rotating through four stations: upper body, lower body, core, and cardio. Some days the exercises will be pre-selected, while on others, students will have the opportunity to construct their own individualized workout plans. Other possibilities include: circuit training, muscle group focus, yoga and cross training. By the close of the term, students should feel comfortable designing and executing their own successful programs.
CREDIT: PE (term)

Wide World of Sports
This class will be devoted to exploring a wide range of different sports and physical activities, including but not limited to soccer, hockey, tennis, badminton, basketball, battleship, ultimate, volleyball, dodge ball, football and target games. Each class will be devoted to learning and understanding the rules, techniques and strategies associated with our sport of the day. Our priority will be to create a fun, fast-paced environment open to all.
CREDIT: PE (term)

Yoga                                                                                                                                                                In this class we will explore all the basics of a complete yoga practice.  We will learn a variety of yoga poses, specific ways of breathing, guided meditation, restorative poses and deep rest techniques.  Our practice of yoga will help increase strength and flexibility.  We will also be developing an understanding of clear alignment that can help prevent injury and ease discomfort in the body.  Most important, we’ll be learning and practicing powerful tools to help alleviate the negative effects of stress and support mindfulness.  The word yoga means “union” or “connection” in Sanskrit, which is the ancient language of Yoga.  Ultimately yoga is a practice that supports our ability to be connected to the deepest truth of who we are and also to be in harmony with the world around us.                               
CREDIT: PE (term)

 

SCIENCE (SC)
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Students are required to take one year of Biological Science (SC-BS) and one year of Physical Science (SC-PS) to graduate. They are required to take one additional year of science for a total of three years of science courses. Within each science, courses are divided by level. Introductory level courses are open to all students and intended for first year students. Intermediate courses have a pre-requisite either in science or in math. Upper and Advanced level courses are intended for juniors and seniors.

Students are required to take one year of Biological Science (SC-BS) and one year of Physical Science (SC-PS) to graduate. They are required to take one additional year of science for a total of three years of science courses. Within each science, courses are divided by level. Introductory level courses are open to all students and intended for first year students. Intermediate courses have a pre-requisite either in science or in math. Upper and Advanced level courses are intended for juniors and seniors.

Biological Science (SC-BS)

Introduction to Biology
Water, Land, and Growth are the themes of this year-long lab science course. It includes a study of the nature of water, theories about the origin of life, the biochemistry of life, and a survey of life in water and on the land with an emphasis on the history of life on Earth and its continuing evolution. We examine molecular aspects of growth including: the structure of DNA and protein synthesis, cell division to form multicellular organisms, reproduction and inheritance. The course is taught through hands-on activities, inquiry, and modeling of concepts. All first year students must enroll in Introduction to Biology. 
Credit: SC-BS (year)

Advanced Biology
Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed both Introduction to Biology and Chemistry.  Statistics is encouraged.
This year-long course will cover the topics and labs from the Advanced Placement curriculum. Students need to consult with the instructor before registering for this class. All students taking Advanced Biology take an additional Advanced Biology Lab period in the spring term. 
CREDIT: SC-BS (year)

Biology Term classes

To take intermediate level courses in Biology, students must have successfully completed Introduction to Biology. Specific eligibility requirements are listed under each course.

Biotechnology 
Prerequisites: Introductory Biology, completion or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry, and completion or concurrent enrollment in Math 300 or above 
This term-long course will investigate the structure and function of DNA, and explore how the tools of biotechnology are used to ‘cut, copy and paste’ genes from one organism into another.  Through virtual labs and hands-on activities, students learn how to use the tools of biotechnology including restriction enzymes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), gel electrophoresis and bacterial transformation.  In addition students research and present current advances in biotechnology.  

CREDIT: SC-BS (term)

Forensic Science
Prerequisite: Introductory Biology
This course will provide an introduction to the scientific methods used to examine physical evidence at a crime scene such as fingerprints, blood, hair, fibers and DNA. Through case studies, we will explore how this evidence can lead to solving crimes. In laboratory activities, students will “lift” and characterize fingerprints, compare hair and fiber samples in the microscope, perform burn tests to identify fibers, and learn how to use gel electrophoresis to visualize unique patterns of DNA for identification purposes. In addition, students will work collaboratively in groups to construct a crime scene for the rest of the class to solve based on forensic evidence.
CREDIT: SC-BS (term)

Human Anatomy and Physiology 
Prerequisite: Introductory Biology
The scientific study of anatomy and physiology explores and describes how the parts of the body are combined and arranged, with each part doing its job to make the body operate as a well-organized whole. In this course we will study the organization and regulation of the body systems of humans, learning by modeling and through activities that will allow each student to learn more about the functioning of their own bodies.
CREDIT: SC-BS (term)

Microbiology
Prerequisite: Introductory Biology
The Microbiology term-elective explores the diversity and impact of microorganisms, particularly bacteria, on human health, the environment and use in biotechnology. The course will explore bacterial growth on plates and liquid media, sterile (aseptic) technique, and the differences in prokaryotic cell membrane and cell wall structure.  Laboratory experiences include differential staining techniques, microscopy, and culturing bacteria.  In addition, students will prepare an independent research project describing a disease-causing pathogen of interest.
CREDIT: SC-BS (term)

Plant Biology
Prerequisite: Introductory Biology 
Because members of the Plant Kingdom live on a different time-scale than humans, we tend to overlook their subtleties and underappreciate their services. In this class, we use observation and inquiry lab experiences to examine the hugely successful life strategies of plants and gain an appreciation of our total dependence on them.
CREDIT: SC-BS (term)

Physical Science (SC-PS)
 

Chemistry
Prerequisite: Completion of Intro to Biology
This class is a year-long investigation of the composition and interactions of matter. Topics covered include: states of matter, physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical reactions, solution calculations, basic stoichiometry, acids and bases, molecular geometry and thermodynamics. Laboratory experiments conducted by students will form an important part of the course. CREDIT: SC-PS (year)

Advanced Chemistry
Prerequisites: successful completion of Chemistry and completion or concurrent enrollment in Precalculus, and permission of the instructor.  Strong math skills required.
In this year-long course students will further their understanding of chemical properties, chemical reactions, quantum theory, stoichiometry, oxidation-reduction reactions and gas laws.  Students will be introduced to advanced chemistry topics including reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, radioactive decay, calorimetry, acid-base titration, spectroscopy and electrochemistry.  Laboratory experiments will supplement classroom instruction.  This class will not follow the Advanced Placement curriculum however students may prepare independently to take the exam.  

CREDIT: SC-PS (year)

Physics
Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry and Pre-calculus, and permission of the instructor
This year long science course is a study of mechanics, force, work, energy, momentum, wave behavior, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, and relativity.
CREDIT: SC-PS (year)

Geology: Materials and History
Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry
This one-term course begins with a looked at the discovery and basic mechanisms of plate tectonics and the earth’s general structure. We then learn the properties and identification of minerals and igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Finally, we move to stratigraphy, paleontology, and the history of the earth.
CREDIT: SC-PS (term) 

Geology: Earth Processes
Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry
This one-term course begins with a looked at the discovery and basic mechanisms of plate tectonics and the earth’s general structure. We then study structural geology, volcanology, magnetism of the earth, and seismology.
CREDIT: SC-PS (term)

Astronomy
Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry
In a one-term survey of major topics in Astronomy, we follow the chronology of discoveries starting with the first attempts to measure the distance to the sun and ending with the reasons for postulating the existence of dark matter and dark energy. The method of approach is to develop an understanding of a particular set of physical principles and then apply them. 
CREDIT: SC-PS (term) 


 

SOCIAL STUDIES (SS)
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Students are required to take nine credits in Social Studies to graduate. These credits must be distributed as follows: three credits for the required year-long freshman Geography course, three credits for the required year-long sophomore Global History course, and three credits for the required year-long junior US History course. Senior seminars (two terms), open to seniors only, are recommended but not required. Elective (term-long) social studies courses are open to students of all ages except where otherwise specified.

Introductory Level

Geography
Required for all freshmen
The purpose of this course is to provide you with a comprehensive introduction to physical and human geography. This course is designed to connect core concepts with case studies in which you will be asked to apply your geographical thinking to real world dilemmas related to the scarcity of natural resources, human population growth, globalization, and the growing polarization between those with access to what is necessary for life and those who routinely go without. Thematic links between this course and your Foundations of Literature and Biology courses will help you grapple with these dilemmas by bridging the perspectives of the humanities, the natural sciences and the social sciences. Keeping one eye on your End-of-Year of Experience in Newton Grove, we will look for ways to connect the theories and facts of human & environmental geography with your growing ability to think through and act out your own geographical imagination in the world around you. 
CREDIT: SS (required) (year)

Intermediate Level

Global History
Required for all sophomores
This theme-based course examines the ways in which human cultural, political, and social systems have evolved over time. The course will be divided into several units that consider historical periods of great change and conflict. The course will pay special attention to ways in which cultures and empires have formed, come into contact with one another, clashed with each other, and occasionally collapsed. Religious thought, the impacts of trade and war, and the practice of power will frame the units of inquiry, and in addition to numerous smaller assignments, a work of original historical research is required.
CREDIT: SS (required) (year) 

Upper Level

U.S. History 
Required for all juniors, required of all students for graduation
This survey class begins with the migration of human beings to the Americas and examines US History up to the 1970s. Students will gain knowledge in historical content as well as practice and instruction in various historical skills. This includes expository and analytical writing, research, primary and secondary source analysis, oral history, public speaking, and family history. Students will examine how and why perspective shapes competing versions of history, and through reading, writing, and discussion, will learn to critically examine historical assertions and analysis. Course content is, when possible, coordinated with the content of American Literature.
CREDIT: SS (required) (year) 

Advanced Level
Advanced level courses are open only to seniors.

Senior Seminar: Being Political
How do we know what we think we know about the world?  How can we be certain?  Is there an objective reality that exists outside of our perceptions, or do our perceptions create reality?  Is there a theory of Truth, or do we exist in a world comprised of multiple and competing truths?  Once we discern what we know about the world and how we know it, how does that inform our ability to act in the world, both morally and politically?  If individual people have different ideas about what is true and how to act, is there a way to determine the best one or a have a legitimate form of authority to which we all agree to adhere, regardless of individuals' ideas?  What are different ways to theorize the relationship between oneself and the world, and which ones are the most ethical to live by?

In this senior seminar class, students will examine how answers to this question have evolved over time.  We will examine both philosophical and political responses to these questions, starting in the ancient Greek world, but focusing primarily on modern European ideas generated since the French Revolution.  The course will be reading and writing intensive, and class sessions will revolve around in-depth discussion of political philosophy and history.  Substantial preparation during the summer gets the course started, and the class culminates with the writing and oral defense of a major paper.
CREDIT: SS (two terms)

Senior Seminar: Environmental History
The goal of this course is to provide motivated seniors with a chance to pursue advanced social studies work, in terms of both content and skills. The level of this class is intended to help seniors bridge the distance between high school survey courses into the kind of focused coursework they will encounter in college. This course will also inevitably call on each student to develop his or her own personal view of how to live in the present American society with a minimum of damage to our planet’s already battered biological systems.

The general theme of “environmental history” is divided into two parts. The first (Fall Term) will look at human environmental impacts from our distant hunter-gatherer past (i.e. over 15,000 years ago!) all across the world, and all the way up through the first (British) phase of the Industrial Revolution (late 1700s- early 1800s). As for the second term (Winter), its theme will be the modern industrial world, with a particular focus on the U.S. Examples of the questions covered then are: What environmental ethic did settlers of English colonies bring over? How did it compare to that of the natives encountered? Were there any differences by region, ethnicity, etc.? How did those colonists respond to the stunning biodiversity and wealth of resources in the “new world.” The Winter term will involve readings, not just from the Hughes textbook, but from American writers grappling with our relationship to “the land” or “Nature”, starting in the 1830s and going up to the present day. Examples of such authors will be both well-known (Thoreau, Muir, Leopold, Abbey, Berry) and lesser known (George Perkins Marsh, etc.). Expectations: positive & prepared discussion participation will be a major ingredient of Credit. There will also be reading responses and a choice between a long class presentation or research paper for each term (topic chosen by student, with instructor's approval).
CREDIT: SS (two terms)

Social Studies Electives

America Abroad: US Foreign Policy
In the aftermath of the 9-11 attacks the question that seemed to be on everyone’s mind was: “Why do they hate us?” The comforting answer, offered by politicians and pundits alike, was that “they” are resentful of “our” freedoms, democratic traditions, essentially our “western” way of life. The realities, if we are willing to listen, are quite different. The grievances, whether in Asia, Africa, Latin America, or beyond, tend not to emanate from jealousy of our exceptionalism, but instead spring from anger at our foreign policy, particularly from the 20th century until the present. This class will be devoted to this often neglected component of US history, namely our role on the global stage, and how it is perceived beyond our own shores.
CREDIT: SS (term)

Election 2016    
Back again! This ELECTIVE class has multiple purposes. In addition to reviewing the (highly unusual!) presidential campaign up to the start of the term, there will also be some basic instruction on the history of the overall election process (including political parties and conventions). We will of course be following the events of the fall campaign and the issues addressed (the election falls conveniently at the end of the term!). Expectations: besides some quizzes on the topics mentioned above, students will be divided into research teams to follow non-presidential races (both in NC and outside) and will turn in final write-ups on the outcomes.

CREDIT: SS (term)

The Immigration Experience
Many of us have ancestors who recently left their homes in Central or South America, Africa, Asia, or Europe to make a new life for them and their children in the United States.  What brought them here?  How did they adapt to a new country, culture, and language? In the process of becoming U.S. citizens, what did they retain or lose from their past?  This class will examine the immigration experience through fiction and oral history.  

You will read two books over the term.  The first, The Fortunate Pilgrim by Mario Puzo, follows the lives of an Italian immigrant family around the turn of the 20th century. This gripping novel will bring to life the immigrant experience, providing a historical account to compare and contrast with our present day readings.  The second book we’ll explore is Underground America: Narratives of Undocumented Lives, which chronicles the lives of 24 undocumented immigrants navigating the uncertain landscapes of the United States. Through these fascinating, provocative oral testimonies we will gain a greater awareness of an unappreciated and often reviled segment of our population.

The hope of this class is to broaden our knowledge of immigration, it’s root causes, the history of immigration to the U.S., legislative responses, the human side of the process in both sending and receiving countries, and finally how these factors shape and influence our perspectives in the present. As a class we want to move from sympathy, where we entertain a level of compassion, to an empathic standpoint that allows for greater understanding and in turn respect.
CREDIT: SS or LA (term) 

Latin American History
Using John Charles Chasteen’s wonderful work, Born in Blood and Fire, we will chart some of the fascinating, gutrenching, and in the end inspiring histories of Latin America. The amazing stories that emanate from of our southern neighbors are worthy of our attention. By studying these histories we can grasp the commonalities that connect, as well as the unique contours that define each country in the Americas. The histories that we will encounter in this course will undoubtedly challenge our way of viewing the contemporary world and will permit a more coherent understanding of what it means to be “American.”
CREDIT: SS  (term)

Quaker Advocacy
In this course, students travel to Washington, DC, for four days to lobby Congress and participate in the Friends Committee on National Legislation’s (FCNL) Spring Lobby Weekend. To prepare for the trip, students first delve into the details of the public policy issue identified by FCNL. In the past, we’ve studied climate change legislation, energy efficiency, drone policies, mass incarceration, and the authorization for the use of military force. After building our public policy knowledge, we use Quaker/consensus process to draft a school-wide declaration of beliefs. In the past, we’ve used Quaker-clerking style small group discussions to facilitate consensus. In this course’s second half, students decide how they wish to apply their newfound lobbying and advocacy skills. In the past, we’ve lobbied the North Carolina General Assembly for climate change legislation, LGBTQ workplace protections, pro-renewable energy laws, and other initiatives.
CREDIT: SS or CS (term)


Philosophy I: Thales to Thomas Aquinas
In this class, we will look at the development of Western Philosophy from the Ancient Greeks through the Middle Ages.   We will ask such questions as:  How do we understand the world outside us?  How do we know what is right and wrong?  How do we decide what is beautiful?  Is there a higher force in the universe?  We will spend some time comparing Western philosophy to non-Western ways of looking at the world. You do not need to take Philosophy II to take this class.
CREDIT: SS or LA (term)

Philosophy II: Descartes to Nietzsche
This class will go on to look at Western philosophy in the Modern world, continuing with the fundamental questions we asked in the first term.  We will especially look at how history in the 19th century is critically important for defining who we are.  The term will primarily focus on the works of Descartes, Kant, Marx, and Nietzsche. It would be helpful, but not necessary to take Philosophy I.
CREDIT: SS or LA (term)

Topics in Psychology I: The Brain, Perception, and Learning 
Open to grades 10-12
This term-long course is NOT a survey of Psychology, but rather focuses specifically on biopsychology (or cognitive psychology). We will explore the neurology of the brain, our senses (specifically vision and hearing) and determine how these form the foundation for (and shape our) learning and memory. Students may take one, two, or all three terms of this course. Open to grades 10-12.
CREDIT: SS or ER(term)

Topics in Psychology II: Human Development, Personality, and Socialization 
Open to grades 10-12
This term-long course is NOT a survey of Psychology, but rather focuses specifically on social psychology. We will explore how we develop through each phase of our lives and delve into specific aspects of our selves such as our gender and sexuality, our personality--what makes us “tick”!  Students may take one, two, or all three terms of this course. Open to grades 10-12.
CREDIT: SS or ER (term)

Topics in Psychology III: Psychological Health, Disorders, and Therapies 
Open to grades 10-12
This term-long course is NOT a survey of Psychology, but rather focuses specifically on psychological disorders. Not only will we explore our emotions and how we express them, we will also delve into stress, its impacts on our health, and specific disorders and their treatments. Students may take one, two, or all three terms of this course. Open to grades 10-12.
CREDIT: SS or ER (term)

 





 
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Carolina Friends School          
4809 Friends School Road
Durham, NC 27705
919.383.6602 tel / 919.383.6009 fax / info@cfsnc.org

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