About CFSAdmissionsCommunityNews & EventsProgramsQuaker IdentitySupport CFS

Course Descriptions

To find the description for a class, please use the menu below to navigate the course listings by credit area.

List of Credit Areas :
Community Service
Cultural Arts
Enrichment
Health
Language Arts
Mathematics
Modern Language and Culture
Physical Education
Science
Social Studies

Please click here to see a list of courses offered by term and by class period.

To see more specific information about graduation requirements, click here.


COMMUNITY SERVICE (CS)
back to list of credit areas

Students are required to take 6 courses in Community Service (2 years) to graduate.

Building Techniques
Students in this class will work on a construction project on campus. Past projects have included a shed for storage, a tree house, and a hut for the pigs belonging to the Lower School.
CREDIT: CS (term)

FiLMS for World Peace: Mentorship
Juniors and Seniors only, instructor approval required
This is a component of the Apprenticeship course and is open for students who have already completed either an independent film study or a film apprenticeship. Mentors help with the design of new projects and support apprentices on location. Mentors will be called upon to lead community outreach and skills workshops that promote the consensus filmmaking model.
CREDIT: CA-VA or CS (term or year)

Film Projects
This course will allow students to work on both service film projects and personal experimental film projects. To that aim, they may select to earn either a service credit or a visual arts credit. Service Film Projects will explore ways that express the mission of CFS in action. The instructor will facilitate the process to help students complete their freestyle projects. Students may opt to work in teams and create fiction or work independently and create a reality/documentary piece. The whole class will serve as a support group to help each student reach his,her or their individual goals. Students can choose to create their projects on cellphones, class IPads or shared class DSLR cameras. No prior film experience necessary.
CREDIT: CA-VA or CS (term)

Peace Economy Now
Students learn about the hidden cost and victims of war as they examine the implications of living in a war economy. This course allows students to participate in the creation of a movement that may impact the expectations and results of the next election cycle, as they learn how to organize, educate and inspire millennials to take responsibility for significant change, using digital technology to increase civic engagement, political transparency and sustainable local and global economic models. Specifically, students will develop strategies for actions that call for reinvesting in people power, promoting democracy, fair trade, and local economies, and respecting the environment and the self-determination of the people who occupy it.
CREDIT: CS (term)

Quaker Advocacy
In this course, students travel to Washington, DC, for four days to lobby Congress and participate in the Friends Committee on National Legislation’s (FCNL) Spring Lobby Weekend. To prepare for the trip, students first delve into the details of the public policy issue identified by FCNL. In the past, we’ve studied climate change legislation, energy efficiency, drone policies, mass incarceration, and the authorization for the use of military force. After building our public policy knowledge, we use Quaker/consensus process to draft a school-wide declaration of beliefs. In the past, we’ve used Quaker-clerking style small group discussions to facilitate consensus. In this course’s second half, students decide how they wish to apply their newfound lobbying and advocacy skills. In the past, we’ve lobbied the North Carolina General Assembly for climate change legislation, LGBTQ workplace protections, pro-renewable energy laws, and other initiatives.
CREDIT: SS or CS (term)

Speaking to the Other
In our polarized society where hate speech is normalized, we cannot afford to miss opportunities to engage the other through our work. Students will learn strategies for creating communication experiences that cross lines of division, whether it be through direct action, civil disobedience, or citizen diplomacy. The theoretical and the practical come together as students explore the nature of conflict resolution, rhetoric and participation. The goal of the final project is not to solve a problem, but to create an opening and space for opposing forces and ideas to be examined respectfully. During the course, the instructor will share authentic material from works challenging islamophobia as students are invited to work with refugees in the community.
CREDIT: CS (term)

Student Ambassadors
Prerequisite: Students must sign up for a minimum of 2 terms. Terms do not have to be consecutive.
Student Ambassadors work closely with the Upper School Dean for Students. They provide a communication link between staff and students. They support and welcome students new to the Upper School. Specific class activities are decided as a result of confidential discussions. Student Ambassadors are called on to play a leadership role in the community and should demonstrate the following qualities:

● Able to abide by confidentiality agreement
● Approachable
● Genuinely invested in the well-being of the school
● Comfortable talking with teachers
● Willing to give up outside class time
● Able to set a good example for CFS students
● Friendly
● Honest and respectful
● Responsible
● Good listener
● Mature enough to stay neutral

CREDIT: CS (2 terms)

Student Liaisons
Juniors and seniors only
This two-term service class fulfills two purposes. First, this group of 11th and 12th graders will participate in the CFS Life classes (fall and winter terms), seeking to befriend, mentor, and support the freshmen as they acclimate to high school life. These students will play a key role in helping to build cohesion and leadership in the freshman class. Students will join the 9th graders on retreat days, and ideally (but not required) accompany them to Newton Grove in the Spring. Second, this group will commit to attending Clerks regularly. Students must apply to be considered for this course.
CREDIT: CS (two terms)

Teacher’s Assistant
Teacher’s assistants work in the Campus Early School, Lower School, Middle School, Upper School, and the Center. In the younger units students might help younger students with their work or assist the classroom teachers with an assortment of tasks. Students may work in the Lower School library or in the Middle School/Upper School library. Students may also serve as a teacher's assistant in the Upper School, either for a specific teacher or in the Main Office. Students who TA in the Center will assist with general work for the entire school. Students should check with individual teachers for such service opportunities before signing up.
CREDIT: CS (term)

Teacher’s Assistant: Art Studio
Students interested in doing service work in the studio are welcome during any period of the day. If you have a specific interest like ceramics or photography, please sign up to assist in those areas.
CREDIT: CS (term)

Teacher’s Assistant: Audio
Students should have an interest in providing sound tech set up or support for various platforms: school and or musical events and classes, organization of electronics and amplification, tech setup and organization in the music hut.
CREDIT: CS (term)

Teacher’s Assistant: Computer Lab
TAs in the Computer Lab will provide assistance to computer users by answering questions about the hardware and software. They will also help to clean and maintain the equipment, install software, make signs, photocopy, and do data entry.
CREDIT: CS (term)

Teacher’s Assistant: Peaceful Schools Program
"If we are to reach real peace in this world and if we are to carry on a real war against war, we shall have to begin with children.” -Gandhi, 1931
Peaceful Schools’ work next year will involve planning student days and our School to Peace Pipeline conference. This could be a great opportunity for students who want to more deeply engage with peace education, race equity work, teaching restorative justice, mindfulness in schools, etc. Much of the work will consist of administrative tasks, but TAs may also help plan (and attend if possible) student days (MS students from CFS, Carter Community Charter School, and Central Park School) and maybe even the conference we'll host at Duke in October.
CREDIT: CS (term)

Tech Theater
This class will function as support for the Upper School Dance Concert and Spring Play. Class work might include set building and design.
CREDIT: CS or CA-PA (term)

Upper School Newspaper
This is a project based class, open to 9th through 12th graders, in which we create and produce a student newspaper. The specific nature of this publication will be determined by members of the class. Whether we decide on sassy and parodic, serious and thoughtful, or some combination thereof, we will review media ethics and the role of news reporting in our society, including some historic highs and lows. Students will learn how to gather background material and check facts, conduct an interview, write news and feature stories, craft effective headlines, and design and lay out a news publication. We will produce several issues of the paper in both print and online formats.
CREDIT: CS or ER (term)

Upper School Service
In Upper School Service classes, students will be caring for the grounds, doing some work on buildings, and generally helping to keep the school running. This class also helps to manage the school's recycling program.
CREDIT: CS (term)

Upper School Yearbook
Students in this two-trimester class will comprise the staff of the 2016-17 Upper School yearbook. Together they will plan, design and produce the yearbook from start to finish. This is an excellent opportunity for anyone interested in photography, drawing, graphic design, marketing, editing, bookkeeping, desktop publishing, and/or project management. There are roles for anyone interested in finding out how a yearbook is made. Close attention to detail is a critical component of this class. Students will have individual responsibilities but will work cooperatively as a team with one common goal: a yearbook to be proud of.
CREDIT: CS or CA-VA (two terms)


CULTURAL ARTS (CA)
back to List of Credit Areas

Students are required to take a total of eight Cultural Arts courses to graduate. Two of these courses must be in the Visual Arts (CA-VA), two in the Performing Arts (CA-PA). Most music classes count as performing arts.

Music

Guitar Class
Learn the basics to play any folk or pop song. Open to the absolute beginner or the intermediate guitarist.
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

Music for Improvisation and Site Specific Dance
This class will work in collaboration with Annie Dwyer's 7th period dance class. We will explore the idea of improvisation on the floor and in the air in various locations. Think of it as ART ON THE MOVE. We will explore principles of spontaneous creation in both movement and sound, working to consciously and collaboratively create a vibrant ensemble of musicians and dancers artistically intertwined. We will work closely with the 7th period music class to experiment with live music and movement in improvisational and set scores. We will work with Rebecca Drake (CFS '92) exploring movement with the silk fabric rigs. We will practice paying attention to our own body, other bodies, the energy of sound, and the physical and sonic space around us.. We will create set pieces in a variety of locations depending on the desire of the group. DANCERS: We will sensitize ourselves in responses to sound and space and create from this source. MUSICIANS: We will explore the idea of both guiding the dancer with sound, being guided by the body of the dancer and experiment with how to use sound as a physical aspect of space with inspiration coming from the concept of sound as environment.
CREDIT CA-PA (term)

Music Appreciation
How did music evolve into the many genres we listen to today? In this class we'll study the evolution of music from its beginnings in various parts of the world. We’ll explore European classical music, American blues and jazz, and the origins of rock, hip-hop, rap, reggae, and Latin American music, as well as music from the Eastern part of the globe. We’ll learn about some fascinating characters along the way – from Beethoven, Igor Stravinsky and John Cage to Tupac, Sister Nancy, ali akbar khan and the Baka pygmies of Cameroon. This class is open to all. Come ready to listen and explore our musical worlds. We may even play a little!
CREDT: CA (term)

Music as Language: Theory and Ear Training
In this class we will explore the language of music from the perspective of harmonic analysis and ear training within Western music. Beginning with listening to works that explore a variety of harmonic practices, we will study the basics of music theory while simultaneously training the ear to understand and predict chord progressions. We will learn some notation skills and develop written analysis at a rate that is comfortable to skill levels of the students within the course. Open to all levels !
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

Music Ensembles 1 & 2
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
These are ensembles for students with an intermediate or advanced skill set on an instrument. We will focus on building skills as collaborative musicians and do a bit of composing original material for the ensemble to play. We will give special attention to theory that will help guide each student’s approach to playing the music. We will build a diverse repertoire of material and perform several times of the course of the year. The stylistic choices of the instrumentalists will determine our repertoire, so feel free to come with certain songs or pieces you would like to learn with friends and we can arrange them for the group.
CREDIT: CA-PA (year)

Mythmusica: Story Worlds, Identity and Interdisciplinary Arts Productions
This collaborative two trimester course will exist as a vision quest via music, fueling an interdisciplinary approach to storytelling with an emphasis on exploring your cultural heritage and what makes you YOU. After an investigation of our identity and how we can best share that story through music, we will develop and share OUR OWN MYTHOLOGY in a final multidisciplinary production. We will begin by getting to know each other with musical dialogue and listening. Simultaneously we will have contact with Literature of the Modern World: Engineering Identity, Difference and Faith. Using stories of journeys like The Alchemist or Ibn Tufayl’s “Alive, son of the awake,” which are being explored in those classes, we will work to identify aspects of ourselves within the works cited, and tell our own stories with the text as a jumping off point. Also in collaboration with Films for World Peace, we will be sure to include video in our efforts to share the story in a physical space designed specifically for our story worlds. Depending on how your personal myths unfold, we will either create a through production or an evening of "shorts” in a physical space that has a variety of angles and uses of space encouraging intimacy for telling one’s own story and encourages non-traditional performer/audience relationships.
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

Percussion Ensemble
This music class is open to all! Come learn about the world of rhythm as we explore the foundations of percussion music by putting together polyrhythmic music. We will learn about tempo and pulse, meter, swing, and improvisation, but will mostly spend our time playing music. This class works best when it’s large, so sign up and encourage your friends! It’ll be a fun and learning-filled good time!
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

Quaker n’Oats
The Upper School a capella group, the Quaker n’Oats, is open to all interested students. The group performs at many school functions including Risers’ Night, Visitors’ Day, and Graduation.
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)


Performing Arts (CA-PA)
back to Cultural Arts

Beginning Acting
This class introduces students to basics of theater performance> It is a prerequisite to participation in any advanced classes or performances. We will work on rudimentary aspects of drama such as physical theater, improvisation, movement, Viewpoints, mask, voice, and ensemble awareness. Students should wear non-restrictive clothing and shoes to class and come prepared to move. The class is required for all students wishing to participate in school theater productions.
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

Fall Production
Prerequisite: Beginning Acting or equivalent course with permission of instructor.
This class will focus on the production of an evening length performance offered to the CFS community and general public.
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

Musical Theater Workshop
Musical Theatre Workshop is an exploration of American Musical Theatre. Students will study the work of the actor/singer/dancer and use their gained knowledge to develop as performers. There will also be a focus on musical theatre history and repertoire. Students will prepare and present as soloists as well as members of small groups and larger ensembles. Since this is a workshop course, students will prepare material for class presentation and critique. The class will participate in a culminating showcase performance at the end of the term.
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

Playwriting
This class teaches students the fundamentals of dramatic structure and character development, as well as introducing a vocabulary for theatrical performance. We will work daily on creative writing exercises that help the playwright craft intelligent and engaging theater. Our goal is to write a short one act play. Successful pieces will be considered for inclusion in the following year’s Winter One Act play festival.
CREDIT: LA or CA-PA (term)

Public Speaking
Over the course of this term, students will learn the fundamentals of public speaking and explore various styles of presentations, from debate to storytelling and many in between. Weekly practices will culminate in a final presentation in a style and on a topic of each student's choice.
CREDIT: ER or CA-PA (term)

Spring Play
Prerequisite: Beginning Acting
Students will rehearse, produce, and perform our Upper School dramatic offering.
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

Tech Theater
This class will function as support for the Upper School Dance Concert and Spring Play. Class work might include set building and design.
CREDIT: CS or CA-PA (term)

Trial Advocacy
Learn the skills of a trial lawyer and have some fun as part of a mock trial team. In this class, a seasoned trial lawyer will teach you how to make an effective opening statement, how to prove your case by questioning your own witnesses, how to ruin the credibility of lying witnesses through cross-examination, how to present exhibits and documents in court, and how to make a winning final argument. A team of members from the class will participate in a local mock trial competition on a weekend in January, with winners of the competition advancing to regional and/or state finals. Do you like to act? Do you enjoy debate? Are you interested in the law? Then this is a class for you.
CREDIT: ER or CA-PA (term)

Winter One-Act Festival
Prerequisite: Beginning Acting
This class will curate five or six short one act plays to perform as part of the Annual US Winter One Act Festival. Students will direct, produce, and perform all work.
CREDIT: CA-PA (term)

Dance - Introductory/Intermediate Level

Dance classes in which students are physically active are cross-listed as Physical Education and Cultural/Performing Arts classes. Students may meet either of those requirements with a dance class, but may not count one class toward both requirements.

Dance 1: Shaping an Impulse
This class will focus on conditioning your body, developing your technical skill, and finding your own voice as a dance designer. Looking at the work of Rudolph Laban and his analysis of time/space/weight/flow and the effort actions, you will develop skill at copying the details of a movement. After analyzing your own movement style, you will then work to expand and refine the specific communication through movement that is required of a dancer or any performer. We will explore partnering and methods of creating dance with multiple bodies. Expect to be challenged technically and creatively in this class. We will look at the body from many viewpoints.
CREDIT AREA: CA-PA or PE (term)

Dance 1: Contemporary Dance Styles
Have you ever wondered about the vast range of techniques and styles that are considered modern or contemporary dance? We will examine the question of what is modern dance? Our explorations will include an opportunity to work with a series of guest artists in specific styles. These guest artists will each teach a unit on their particular area of expertise. The styles will range from traditional modern to hip-hop to social dance. You will develop your technical skills as you experiment with new ways of moving your body. Along the way we will analyze the characteristics of each style of dance and study the choreographers who have brought the style forward. Students will be required to dress out and participate on a daily basis. There will be a collaborative project inspired by a contemporary dancer and in class journal reflections. Students are limited to 3 excused absences for course credit.
CREDIT: CA-PA or PE (term)

Dance 1: Experiential Anatomy for Dancers and Athletes
This dance class will be participatory in nature and we will move every day. It will provide an opportunity to study the body and bring fundamental body perceptions into focus. We will learn about the body with the goal of being able to sense basic information about the body and its parts. Think bones, skin, fascia, eyes and breath. When we can refine and differentiate our perception of our skeleton, it helps to free more parts of our body to move. Visual perception leads to understanding the different ways we can use our sense of attention. The breath is basic to the way we individually organize our movement. Understanding the body deepens our capacity to be present on stage, on the field or court and in day to day life. A final project will enable students to share their anatomical knowledge in a creative project. The class will attempt to personalize the concepts of anatomy.
CREDIT AREA: CA-PA or PE (term)

Social Dance: Finding the Center We will learn and develop the basics of a variety of partner dance styles and explore creative and diverse ways of moving together while celebrating and developing your authentic inspiration for movement. We will dive into the fundamentals of partner dance connection, musicality, the power of breath, and elements that will enhance your communication and confidence on the social dance floor and in life. We will focus on a variety of social dance styles such as Salsa, Swing, Waltz, Tango and more! This class is designed to promote fun, build self confidence, learn about different cultures through dance and music, support teamwork and deepen your understanding of partner dance fundamentals and possibilities. This class is suitable for dancers at all levels. CREDIT AREA; CA-PA or PE (term)

Dance - Intermediate/Advanced Level

Dance 2: Modern Dance: Collaboration & Performance
Prerequisite: Consistent dance experience in the US or permission of instructor
This class will emphasize the body in motion and the technique of modern dance. Students will work collaboratively with two guest choreographers to create dances inspired by a theme chosen by last year’s participants. . Dancers will be asked to contribute and learn dance phrases in the process. There will be a specific emphasis on the relationship between technical and creative development. STUDENTS NEED TO TAKE THIS CLASS FOR BOTH THE FALL AND WINTER TERMS BECAUSE THE MATERIAL IS CUMULATIVE. There will be required outside rehearsals initially on Monday afternoons and then on Thursday afternoons in December until the concert sharing. These rehearsals are coordinated with the sports program. After winter break, dancers will have the opportunity to choreograph and collaborate with a guest artist during the last third of the term. Students are limited to 3 excused absences for course credit.
CREDIT: CA-PA or PE (two terms)

Dance 2: Dance Composition
This process-oriented class will have a joyful lab-like atmosphere where experimentation is valued. We will work with visual art, music, photography, props and text as tools to use for generating ideas, movement and choreography. Through a refined series of in class assignments you will delve deeply into your own creative process and share your findings with the group. The idea is to come at choreography from many angles, to create and view multiple studies, and to try compositional ideas that open up the sense of what dance can be and what dance can communicate. Dancers will be asked to create a final concept piece that builds on the material we have covered in class.
CREDIT: CA-PA or PE (term)

Improvisation and Site Specific Dance
This class will work in collaboration with musicians. We will explore the idea of improvisation on the floor and in the air in various locations. Think of it as ART ON THE MOVE. We will explore principles of spontaneous creation in both movement and sound, working to consciously and collaboratively create a vibrant ensemble of dancers artistically intertwined.. We will work closely with the 7th period music class to experiment with live music and movement in improvisational and set scores. We will work with Rebecca Drake (CFS '94) exploring movement with the silk fabric rigs. We will practice paying attention to our own body, other bodies, the energy of sound and the physical and sonic space around us.. We will create set pieces in a variety locations depending on the desire of the group. DANCERS: We will sensitize ourselves to sound and spaces and create from this source. MUSICIANS: We will explore the idea of both guiding the dancer with sound, being guided by the body of the dancer and experiment with how to use sound as a physical aspect of space with inspiration coming from the concept of sound as environment.
CREDIT: CA-PA or PE (term)

Dance - Advanced Level

Advanced Dance: Collaboration & Performance
Prerequisite: Modern Dance or Advanced Dance & Permission of Instructor
Students will work collaboratively to develop work thematically related to a theme chosen by last year’s participants. The theme will be explored in dance, poetry and video. Dancers participating in this project will need to do in depth research during the summer months and generate dance phrases. All dancers will meet in August with the instructor, videographer and other artists where their findings will shape the direction of the concert. Students will explore motivations for selecting movement around the stated theme. The concert will be one continuous thought that invites audience engagement in a particular way. There will be opportunities for dancers to design small portions of this collaborative work based on their research. This process requires a high level of commitment and self-direction. After school rehearsals on Monday afternoons will be required until winter break. There will be a sharing of work towards the end of October. Outside rehearsals are coordinated with the sports program. STUDENTS NEED TO TAKE ADVANCED DANCE IN BOTH THE FALL AND WINTER TERMS BECAUSE THE MATERIAL IS CUMULATIVE. After winter break students will have the opportunity to work with guest artists during the last third of the term. Students are limited to 3 excused absences for credit.
CREDIT: CA-PA or PE (two terms)


Visual Arts (CA-VA)
back to Cultural Arts

8 credits required: 2 in visual arts (CA-VA), 2 in performing arts (CA-PA), remaining 4 in either discipline.

Ceramics
The class includes an introduction to clay for both vessels and sculpture (including slipping and scoring, hand-building, using the slab roller, wheel, kiln firing and glazes). Once foundation techniques are introduced, projects may explore abstraction of forms, structure and construction, function, figures and work in a series. Students will also have the opportunity to view and discuss modern and contemporary artists working with clay materials, and will be asked to participate in group critiques in class.
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Design in Action
This class introduces the elements and principles of design to students through projects in a variety of media. Framed by the Design Thinking process as developed by Stanford’s Design School, students will gain a rich arts vocabulary, and make use of color theory, elements and principles of design and composition. Another goal for the class is helping students learn how to work as a design team to create, develop, and critique ideas. After introductory experiments, students are asked to apply what they’ve learned by working with projects. Over the course of the term, students will engage as a ‘hireable’ studio of designers available to create posters and promotional materials for CFS clubs, events and activities. We will aim to create design work that’s engaging, memorable, and effective at moving the viewer toward action.
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Digital Art
Digital art is an artistic work or practice that uses digital technology as an essential part of the creative or presentation process. Students will gain experience working with photo-manipulation and editing software, as well as learning more about how to paint using a digital screen. Depending on the leanings of the students, projects may include poster design, illustration, installation and projection, manipulated scanned images, digital collage, sound/music art, animation/gifs, and interactive performances.
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Drawing & Painting
This class exposes students to a variety of two-dimensional media, through practicing techniques necessary for developing drawing and painting skills. The class focuses on using design, color theory and composition principles in 2-D artwork, and applies them to projects that encourage students to draw what they see and feel, and to visually share their ideas and visions of the world. The first part of the term will focus primarily on drawing through still life, portraiture and life drawing, landscapes, and storytelling, and the second part of the term will be spent learning color theory applying these experiences to extended conceptual projects in wet media. Critiques throughout the term will allow students to gain feedback from their peers and instructor and gain confidence with their arts vocabulary and understanding of idea, form, idiom, structure, craft and surface/impact. Students will work with graphite, pen and ink, charcoal, china marker, chalk and oil pastels, colored pencils, watercolor, gouache and acrylic paint.
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

FiLMS for World Peace: Apprenticeship
By way of a collaboration between Carolina Friends School and FiLMS for World Peace, Apprentices will gain activist filmmaking experience through the development and execution of projects that will be shared in the community as a catalyst for raising awareness and action for social causes. Apprentices will become part of the FiLMS for World Peace platform that empowers people to “transform conflict into discovery” through the development of storyworlds. Students can enroll with no previous film experience. As apprentices they will learn to write, project-manage, direct, shoot, edit and market collaborative projects as they build community. Apprentices will go beyond making one-off films to examining how filmmakers create agency through multiple platforms, campaigns and social entrepreneurship. Apprentices will also have opportunities to collaborate with FiLMS for World Peace Fellows from the Continuing Education Program at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University as they earn credit towards a collaborative certificate from CDS and FiLMS for World Peace while laying the foundations for the FiLMS for World Peace Festival to be housed at Carolina Friends School. Students will also have site visits to the local public access TV station and produce pieces that will be considered for broadcast.
CREDIT: CA-VA or CS (term or year)

FiLMS for World Peace: Mentorship
Juniors and Seniors only, instructor approval required
This is a component of the Apprenticeship course and is open for students who have already completed either an independent film study or a film apprenticeship. Mentors help with the design of new projects and support apprentices on location. Mentors will be called upon to lead community outreach and skills workshops that promote the consensus filmmaking model.
CREDIT: CA-VA or CS (term or year)

Film Projects
This course will allow students to work on both service film projects and personal experimental film projects. To that aim, they may select to earn either a service credit or a visual arts credit. Service Film Projects will explore ways that express the mission of CFS in action. The instructor will facilitate the process to help students complete their freestyle projects. Students may opt to work in teams and create fiction or work independently and create a reality/documentary piece. The whole class will serve as a support group to help each student reach his,her or their individual goals. Students can choose to create their projects on cellphones, class IPads or shared class DSLR cameras. No prior film experience necessary.
CREDIT: CA-VA or CS (term)

MakerLab: 3D Design and Fabrication
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 or permission of instructor
This hands-on course will focus on the tools and techniques required for computer-aided fabrication of 3D objects. We’ll take an overview of additive and subtractive machining and then focus primarily on the processes involved in 3D printing and scanning. Students will explore different software options for generating 3D designs and take an in-depth look at the opportunities and constraints of designing for 3D printing.

This class will be computer-intensive, requiring students to learn the basics of several different software platforms and create simple printable designs from each. We will spend the last part of the term designing and producing original objects that can be either functional or artistic in nature. For this project, students will choose which software they’d like to learn in more depth.
CREDIT: CA-VA or ER (term)

Mixed Media
This is primarily a 3D course in which students will begin the term engaging in workshops that introduce basics of construction, manipulation, and assemblage. We will focus on how different materials translate into meaning, depending on construction, composition and use of color theory. We will learn the basics of yarn and fiber arts as well as working with paper and found and reusable materials- then bring them to life through a variety of projects. We'll also focus on a variety of attachment processes, including sewing, gluing, binding, and wrapping.
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Photography
This class begins with a history of photography, including 35mm black and white photography, learning about cameras, film, and darkroom techniques. The students will be in the darkroom for much of the term, as well as using phones and digital cameras to develop skills in composition, art making and storytelling. All will participate in critiques and share feedback throughout the term. Chemistry and darkroom safety will be covered along with responsible darkroom set up and clean up. Students must provide their own cameras or make arrangements ahead of time to be sure one is available for their use during the term (we do have a number of school film cameras available). A materials fee will be charged for this class.
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Printmaking Techniques
The variety of printmaking processes available are broad, and can produce unexpected and powerful, unique imagery. In this class, students will combine drawing exercises with carving and printing processes such as: Reduction Prints, Stamps, Foam and Linoleum Printing, Spray Painted Stencils, and Screen Printing. We’ll also learn about some of the pioneers and contemporary artists that use these processes as we make work of our own.
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Portfolio
This class is for juniors and seniors only (or by portfolio application if a first or second year), and is a studio class focusing on building and presenting a portfolio of work. Students will sign up for both terms of this fall and winter class and work during the fall term to develop skills in a wide variety of materials through advanced art experiments, then have the winter term to work independently to solidify their visual voice and compile their portfolios. Near the transition between fall and winter terms, students will attend (as part of the course curriculum), a National Portfolio Day event in Charlotte, Richmond, or Washington, DC. National Portfolio Days are meant as opportunities for high school students to present a body of their work to a variety of Art Schools from all over the US and abroad. Being self-motivated and focused is of the utmost importance, as this class offers a lot of studio time to work on individual projects, but aiming to attend an art school or study art after CFS is not a prerequisite. Students may not sign up for winter term without being enrolled in the fall term.
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)

Independent Art Projects
This class is designed for students who have experience in the arts studio and who have a vision of a project (or series of projects) they would like to work on with minimal direction. This might be an opportunity for a student to spend more time in the darkroom developing film or using the ceramics wheel for more focused periods of time. There is a thorough application process in order to receive credit for this experience.
CREDIT: CA-VA (term)


ENRICHMENT (ER)
back to List of Credit Areas

We offer term-long enrichment courses in a variety of subject areas.

American Sign Language I
The first trimester of beginner ASL concentrates on vocabulary, simple sentence structure, and learning visual cues of lip formation, facial expression, hand positioning, repetitive motion and body language. The second trimester explores the more complex sentence structures of ASL syntax. The final trimester will focus on interpreting songs and stories along with everyday conversational skills. Beginning ASL class is characterized by a relaxed setting and progress according to the learning level of the students.
CREDIT: ER (year)

American Sign Language II
Prerequisite: ASL I
Second year ASL students will continue to add to their vocabulary as well as work on hand, expression and mouth coordination. Simulated interpreter situations will be set up to give the students hands-on experience with ASL interpretation. Conversational skills will be honed and the majority of class communication will be simultaneously signed and spoken. The class will also help design a model ASL beginner course, equipping those completing the course with tools to become teachers, themselves.
CREDIT: ER (year)

Car Maintenance
This car maintenance class offers instruction in three areas: 1) gaining familiarity with the various systems on a motor vehicle (brakes, cooling, electrical, etc.), 2) performing basic maintenance on motor vehicles, and 3) acquiring a more comprehensive understanding of how vehicles actually perform and react to various road conditions and driver inputs (accelerating, braking, and turning). Our discussions will go into these topics in a little more detail than that of a typical Driver’s Education program. We will learn both from the textbook and from hands-on exercises and maintenance work done on actual cars… so be prepared for both. Sign-up priority will be given to students who are already driving.
CREDIT: ER (term)

CFS Careers I: The World of Work
Sophomores and juniors only
During this course, students will embark on career exploration through an external lens. What else can you do in the health professions besides go to medical school? What does “pre-law” mean and why can’t you major in it? What is an internship, why are they helpful, and how do you get one? What’s the difference between a job and a career? Students will use Naviance and other resources to explore the answers to these questions and more.
CREDIT: ER (term)

CFS Careers II: What Do You Want to be When You Grow Up?
Sophomores and juniors only
This course entails introspective career exploration. What are your interests, strengths, and growing edges? How do they align with different career possibilities? How can you leverage them in the classroom and in community? Students will learn about various career guidance models, and perhaps deepen or find a new passion or three along the way.
CREDIT: ER (term)

The Culture of the Middle East
Wa-hey! If I’m Muslim, am I a terrorist? Should I wear a veil? Wow, maybe I should take a class on the culture of the Middle East and be given the ability to understand and appreciate a culture outside of the narratives of American media! Whaaat??? They offer that here? It offers discourse on charged political topics as well, such as Palestine/Israel and Western Feminism and the Hijab? That’s so cool! I’m gonna take it! I can learn about the rich variety of cultures in the Middle East through projects and outside speakers? I’m looking forward to participating in class and writing reflections!
CREDIT: ER (term)

History through Film
This class is theme-based (prior examples are Film Noir, Westerns, Cold War, etc.). We will watch a chronological sequence of films centered on the theme; students are required simply to write a response for each film.
CREDIT: ER (term)

How To Adult
Do you know how to use chopsticks, jumpstart a car, do laundry, write a check, stick to a budget, read a map, sew on a button, prepare a simple meal, use basic tools, fill out a job application, leave a tip, build a fire, buy a car, write a thank you note? How about finding an apartment, rewiring a lamp, fixing a running toilet, introducing people to one another in the proper order (yes, there is a proper order), making a reason-based decision, managing your time, protecting yourself from identity theft? In this class we will tackle all these skills and more, drawing on the wide array of expertise available in the CFS community. A fun and entertaining way to rehearse for life on your own.
OPEN TO ALL GRADES
CREDIT: ER (term)

Introduction to Computer Programming
Prerequisite: completion of Algebra 2 or permission of the instructor
This course is intended for students who have done little or no computer programming. Specific languages may vary, but generally students first learn HTML for making web pages and then move to Python for general programming. The goal is to become comfortable using variables, conditional statements, loops and subroutines. The power of top-level modular design and “stubbing” to facilitate effective testing will be introduced. Students who have completed Algebra 2 will be most comfortable in this class. Other students should talk to the instructor before signing up.
CREDIT: ER (term)

MakerLab: Basic Tools and Techniques
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 or permission of instructor
This one-term, project-based course will serve as an introductory course for our Maker/STEAM program. Students will learn to use both hand and power tools in the lab. Basic electronics will be covered, with all students developing proficiency with simple to moderately-complex circuits and their construction. Both breadboarding and soldering work will be used and students will learn to use digital multimeters to aid in their electronics work.

We will reverse-engineer various hardware devices to take an in-depth look at how they were built and what decisions were made in their design and construction. Over the course of the term, students will use basic instruction notes to build small projects, culminating in a larger, more detailed project which will be either based on their original designs or as hardware “hacks” to improve existing designs. The entire engineering design process will be examined and followed as students learn to develop their ideas, from concept to prototype.
CREDIT: ER (term)

MakerLab: 3D Design and Fabrication
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 or permission of instructor
This hands-on course will focus on the tools and techniques required for computer-aided fabrication of 3D objects. We’ll take an overview of additive and subtractive machining and then focus primarily on the processes involved in 3D printing and scanning. Students will explore different software options for generating 3D designs and take an in-depth look at the opportunities and constraints of designing for 3D printing.

This class will be computer-intensive, requiring students to learn the basics of several different software platforms and create simple printable designs from each. We will spend the last part of the term designing and producing original objects that can be either functional or artistic in nature. For this project, students will choose which software they’d like to learn in more depth.
CREDIT: CA-VA or ER (term)

MakerLab: CNC Tools and Techniques (not offered in 2017-18)
Prerequisite: Algebra 2 and at least one MakerLab course
This hands-on course will focus on advanced tools and techniques used in computer-aided fabrication of objects. We’ll review additive, subtractive and other types of computer controlled machining, gaining an appreciation for the strengths and weaknesses of each. Some time will be spent on 3D printing, and then we’ll branch out to other CNC (computer numerical control) machines such as a laser cutter/engraver and a CNC mill.

This class will be computer-intensive. Students will explore different software options for generating 2D & 3D designs and take an in-depth look at the opportunities and constraints of designing for different fabrication methods. In addition to learning how to use lightweight CAD (computer aided design) and CAM (computer aided machining) programs, students will learn how to properly operate and care for the CNC machines.

The last month of the term will be spent designing and producing an original project using techniques learned in this class and previous MakerLab courses. For example, a student who previously completed the Microcontrollers course may elect to use an Arduino board to incorporate interactive features into the final project.
CREDIT: ER (term)

Public Speaking
Over the course of this term, students will learn the fundamentals of public speaking and explore various styles of presentations, from debate to storytelling and many in between. Weekly practices will culminate in a final presentation in a style and on a topic of each student's choice.
CREDIT: ER or CA-PA (term)

Trial Advocacy
Learn the skills of a trial lawyer and have some fun as part of a mock trial team. In this class, a seasoned trial lawyer will teach you how to make an effective opening statement, how to prove your case by questioning your own witnesses, how to ruin the credibility of lying witnesses through cross-examination, how to present exhibits and documents in court, and how to make a winning final argument. A team of members from the class will participate in a local mock trial competition on a weekend in January, with winners of the competition advancing to regional and/or state finals. Do you like to act? Do you enjoy debate? Are you interested in the law? Then this is a class for you. Open to grades 10-12, and 9th by permission of the instructor.
CREDIT: ER or CA/PA (term)

Upper School Newspaper
This is a project based class, open to 9th through 12th graders, in which we create and produce a student newspaper. The specific nature of this publication will be determined by members of the class. Whether we decide on sassy and parodic, serious and thoughtful, or some combination thereof, we will review media ethics and the role of news reporting in our society, including some historic highs and lows. Students will learn how to gather background material and check facts, how to conduct an interview, how to write news, feature stories, and effective headlines, and how to design and lay out a news publication. We will produce several issues of the paper in both print and online formats.
CREDIT: CS or ER (term)


HEALTH & HUMAN SEXUALITY (HS)
back to List of Credit Areas

"Friends view sexuality as a Divine gift. It is the source of human life and a part of our identity and self-understanding. At Carolina Friends School (CFS) we want students to understand sexual intercourse as a profound expression of love at its deepest, most caring, and responsible level. Teenagers who wait to experience intercourse in a loving, committed relationship will gain the greatest appreciation for this gift. We encourage our students to abstain from sexual intercourse until they grow into such a relationship. We ask CFS families to join us in sharing this message with our students." From Carolina Friends School Sexuality Education Policy, April 24, 1992

Each student must complete one credit in Health for graduation.

Adolescent Health
Required for all students except freshmen (who will satisfy the Adolescent Health requirement though CFS Life)

Adolescent Health is a topical exploration of health issues especially important to teenagers. The information is vital in preparing students to make safe and healthy decisions about their present and future lives. Students will focus on four main areas: wellness and self care, mental health, sexual health and drug education. Students will have a great deal of input in reference to the topics we cover in depth.
CREDIT: HS (term)

CFS Life
This two-term class is required for all freshmen.
The transition into upper school is one of excitement as well as trepidation. It is a unique point in a young person's life. It is a time of varying emotional, social, physical and intellectual growth. Carolina Friends School not only wants to name this transition but address it by providing a class for all 9th graders which focuses on these timely issues. The goal of CFS Life class is to ease the transition into upper school as well as address the health issues teens face as they move toward adulthood. Major areas addressed are Upper School orientation, Quaker philosophy, study skills, mental health, spiritual health, wellness and self care, sexual health, and drug education. The course will be co-taught by CFS staff. (Students from the upper grades will act as mentors and student liaisons, receiving credit for this service).
CREDIT: 1 HS, 1 ER (two terms)

Senior Life
Prerequisite: Senior standing
So, you've almost graduated from CFS. You have just one more trimester to complete. This class is about preparing you for college life. The class will open with the questions: what is on your mind, what are your worries, what are you excited about, what would be helpful to know? We will bring alumni in to share experiences, offer suggestions and drop some hints. You will conduct research on the college of your choice. Do you know where the learning resource center is? Do you know where the office for international travel is? Do you want to join an organization? Do you know where the counseling center is and what services they provide? Next we will cover some issues many college freshmen face: budget and financial stability, time management, study skills, roommate conflict resolution, peer pressure, alcohol and drug use, and sexual safety, conduct, choice, consent and refusal. Students will have a great deal of input on what we discuss and study.
CREDIT: HS (term)

LANGUAGE ARTS (LA)
back to List of Credit Areas

Students are required to take one Language Arts class for each term they are enrolled at Carolina Friends School. Twelve credits are required to graduate (4 years). Classes are structured by level. In addition to these year-long required courses, there are several elective offerings.

Foundations of Literature
Required for all freshmen
This year long course is designed to provide an introduction to literary analysis, a space to explore your own relationship with literature, an opportunity to develop your reading and writing skills, and a place for deeper reflection about your relationship with the natural world. In the first term, we will inquire into how water functions as a symbol, as a metaphor, and as an encounter with your environment. In the second and third terms, we will focus on the themes of land and growth. Throughout this class, you will be asked to understand how others have explored their relationships with the environment and their changing worlds, and to clarify and intensify your own ability to explain that relationship. By linking this course thematically to your Geography and Biology courses, you will gain a comprehensive environmental studies curriculum from which to grapple with these issues, bridging the perspectives of the humanities, the natural sciences and the social sciences. Keeping one eye on your End-of-Year of Experience in Newton Grove, we will look for ways to connect the experiences of those about whom we read with your own interactions in an ever-changing world.
CREDIT: LA (year - required)

Global Literature
Required for all sophomores
Building from the questions that arise during the 9th grade End-of-Year Experience in Newton Grove, NC, this year long sophomore level course uses literature to understand the relationship between identity and meaning. Students will read examples of literature that reveal different ways to make meaning in and of the world through their use of symbolism, form and content, with a stress on literature from the non-European world. But rather than just survey different cultural worldviews as represented in exemplary texts, students will be asked to examine the ways in which the literature they read raises questions about the possible commensurability of different systems of meaning in order to understand more fully how people can make meaning across lines of perceived difference. By the end of the course, students will be better equipped to identify the ways in which one’s identity contributes to how one understands the world, as well as the conditions of possibility for stepping outside of one’s own worldview and into that of another. Because this course will be linked to the sophomore Global History course, students will be able to understand this relationship between identity and meaning within the context of globalization, both in historical and contemporary ways. Not only will students utilize literature to understand the process of globalization and how people make globalization meaningful, but students will also examine the ways in which literature itself can be a “global” cultural product. Ultimately, students will gain a deepened understanding of what culture means and the complexity of its representation. Students will refine their critical reading skills through regular reading assignments as well as improve their ability to write evidence-based, analytical essays by using the revision process to sharpen their written argumentation.
CREDIT: LA (year - required)

American Literature
Juniors only

This year-long course traces the American experience through a selection of novels, short stories, essays, poems, and plays. The texts we will read and discuss will reflect the rich diversity of this nation and its history. We will consider how literature expresses the complex identities that find expression in America, and therefore must include a wide range of individual and collective voices. As we read and discuss together, we will consider how the plot, context, characterization, and imagery of the works relate to our own contemporary experience in America. Selected authors include Edgar Allan Poe, Eudora Welty, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, and Joy Harjo.
CREDIT: LA (year)

Literature of the Modern World: Engineering Identity, Difference and Faith
Open to juniors and to seniors who did not take Literature of the Modern World as juniors
Not only will this course examine texts written in the modern world, but it will look at how the modern world engages with and critiques older literature. We will ask what defines culture, community and conflict as we define the other. We will also question our relationship with establishment forces and how the individual opens the door to his, her or their own exploitation or achievement. The readings will draw upon recent conflicts between the East and West through voices that have stepped away from the tribe into ‘third cultures’ such as Hayy Ibn Yaqzan, The Alchemist, and others. We will examine the journey taken by the characters in these stories as students reflect on their own identity and development through writing assignments that will be workshopped and revised.
CREDIT: LA (year)

Meaning and Representation in the Modern World: Literature since Columbus

Seniors only
This year-long, advanced humanities course will provide students a way to understand how meaning and its representations has shaped—and been shaped by—historical and geographical changes brought forth since 1492. Since then, the divide between the Global North and the Global South has coalesced around an idea of modernity, while colonial relationships have served as a large factor in shaping cultures, economies, environments, histories, politics, and societies across that divide for the last 500+ years. This course will use major aesthetic and philosophical movements from the Caribbean, continental America, South Asia, sub-Saharan Africa and Western Europe in order to study meaning and its representations within that context of modernity. Students enrolling in this course should expect to complete nightly reading assignments, regular short writing assignments and longer, analytical essays as well as independent research on the course topics. The course will bring students to the contemporary postmodern/postcolonial moment in order to ask: so what does the world mean now (and how should we act in it)?
CREDIT: LA (year)

Senior Seminar: Gothic Literature and Society
Seniors only
This course considers the specific genre of Gothic Literature and asks how a genre that literally begins with a late eighteenth century author’s dream has developed into something that lives on into the present. Gothic Literature is based on exploring tensions between opposites and foils within narratives replete with mystery and terror. The genre's stories are often set in medieval castles or isolated estates. Within Gothic’s labyrinthine narratives, we find death, decay, and disintegration, yet sometimes there is also a glimpse of rebirth, the hope for renewal, or a complete transformation. Studying deeply the aesthetics and conventions of the genre allows us to consider how these texts speak to our modern social, cultural, and historical realities. Authors will span from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries, and will include Horace Walpole, Matthew Lewis, Ann Radcliffe, Charlotte Bronte, Zora Neale Hurston, Angela Carter, Isabel Allende, Brenda Marie Osbey, and Jean Rhys.
This course will challenge you to read, discuss, research, and write about literature and its relevance as you consider our authors’ cultural context and audience. You will have the option of writing two seminar papers (literary, analytic, or critical) or presenting a multimodal presentation that incorporates research and analysis.
CREDIT: LA (two terms)

Language Arts Electives

Creative Writing
Our species loves lies. Ever since our earliest ancestors gathered around the fire to listen spellbound to tales spun by the imagination, humans have had an insatiable thirst for this kind of entertainment -- and once writing was developed, we could even be lied to by people who were already dead! This course offers students the opportunity to practice various forms of creative writing and the option to share their work with the class. We use structured exercises as a springboard to free writing, while taking a look at some excerpts from classic works to answer the question “How did they do that?” In the process, we’ll find that this brand of lying is actually a supercharged form of truth.
CREDIT: LA (term)

Literature of Strange Encounters
We’re all familiar with the daily round of existence – eating, sleeping, working, playing, etc – but what if this known surface suddenly cracked open to reveal an entirely different reality? Through fiction, plays and poems, this course will explore a variety of strange encounters with the otherworld beings whose realities sometimes intersect with or intrude upon our own. We’ll search for similarities and differences between those alternate worlds and ours, ask what conditions are necessary for such encounters to take place, and consider what we might learn from them.
CREDIT: LA (term)

Playwriting
This class teaches students the fundamentals of dramatic structure and character development, as well as introducing a vocabulary for theatrical performance. We will work daily on creative writing exercises that help the playwright craft intelligent and engaging theater. Our goal is to write a short one act play. Successful pieces will be considered for inclusion in the following year’s Winter One Act play festival.
CREDIT: LA or CA-PA (term)

Reading and Writing Poetry in a Time of Resistance
This class will focus on the reading and writing of poetry and look at how poetic language can be used to undergird political actions and moral values. The class will be divided between the writing and sharing of our own poetry and the reading of contemporary poets with a strong social voice including Joy Harjo, Mahmoud Darwish, Warsan Shire, and others.
CREDIT: LA (term)

Your Granny’s Grammar
Do you know the difference between continuous and continual? How about affect and effect? Lie and lay? What’s wrong with saying “in close proximity” or “blatantly obvious”? In this class we will tackle the components of English grammar and usage, from parts of speech and sentence structure to proper syntax and expression. Transitive verbs and demonstrative pronouns, antecedents and gerunds -- you’ll learn what they are and how to use them. You’ll also spend some class time increasing your vocabulary with the online game freerice.com, which donates ten grains of rice to the World Food Programme for every correct answer, and you'll have a chance to use your new words in conversation. If there’s time, we’ll explore Greek and Latin roots, prefixes, and suffixes that will help you decipher the meaning of unfamiliar words. Learn to express yourself with confidence in the language of William Shakespeare, Edgar Allan Poe, and Toni Morrison!
CREDIT: LA (term)


MATHEMATICS (MA)
back to List of Credit Areas

Students are required to complete three year-long mathematics courses during their four years of US. Most students will find it to their advantage to take four year-long mathematics courses during their US career. The particular courses will vary depending on the strengths and inclinations of the individual student. Students may enhance their mathematics experience with term-long elective courses.

Calculator note: The math department requires each student to have a graphing calculator. Currently, the Texas Instruments TI-84© is being used at CFS.

Math 100 (Algebra 1)
This course is open to incoming US students depending on their mathematics background. It will cover the same topics as Math 105, but will develop the topics at a slower pace and in less depth than Math 105.
Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year )

Math 105 (Algebra 1)
This course is open to freshmen on the recommendation of their MS teachers. Topics include:

●Review of arithmetic operations
●Ratios
●Linear equations and inequalities
●Systems of linear equations and inequalities
●Exponents
●Square roots
●Polynomial expressions
●Introduction to quadratic equations

Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Math 205 (Geometry)
This course is open to students who have been successful in Math 100 or Math 105. It is not open to freshmen. This course will cover the same basic topics as Math 210, but from an inductive and empirical approach, rather than a theoretical and deductive approach. There will also be an emphasis on numerical computation and algebraic methods.
Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Math 210 (Geometry)
This course is designed for students who were successful in Math 105. Students who were highly successful in Math 100 may enroll with instructor permission. Freshmen may enroll in this class on the recommendation of their Middle School teachers. The objects studied include lines and angles, triangles, quadrilaterals, general and regular polygons, circles and solid figures. Topics of study include constructions with straightedge and compass, measurement (angular, linear, area and volume), congruency, similarity and proofs. There is also an introduction to right triangle Trigonometry. Geometer’s Sketchpad or similar software is used when appropriate, on the school’s computers.
TEXT: Elementary Geometry for College Students, 3rd ed. by Alexander and Koeberlein (0-618-22176-X) and instructor's handouts.
CREDIT: MA (year)

Math 310 (Algebra 2)
This course is open to students who have completed Math 205 or Math 210. It is not open to ninth graders. This course will cover the same basic topics as Math 320, but it will develop the topics at a slower pace and to less depth, and will prepare students for Functions and Modeling. This course is not intended as preparatory background for Precalculus, but students who are highly successful may, after consulting with their instructor, consider Precalculus instead of Functions and Modeling.
TEXT: Intermediate Algebra, 4th ed. by Larson (0-618-38826-5) and instructor's handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Math 320 (Algebra 2)
This course is designed for students who were successful in MA210. Students who were highly successful in MA205 could consider this course, but only with instructor permission. Freshmen who have worked at an advanced level during their MS careers are also eligible, but only on the recommendation of their MS teachers.

Students who are successful in this course should consider enrolling in Precalculus, after consulting with the instructor. Function and Modeling is also available as a next math course.

Topics include:

●Rational Expressions: Factoring, Simplifying and Operations
●Absolute Value Equations
●Introduction to Functions
●Linear Equation Review
●Quadratic Equations
●Complex Numbers
●Conic Sections
●Introduction to Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

TEXT: Intermediate Algebra, 4th ed. by Larson (0-618-38826-5) and Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Functions & Modeling (Trigonometry, Consumer Math, Introduction to Statistics)
These courses are open to students who have successfully completed Math at the 300-level and who do not plan to take Precalculus at CFS. All three trimesters combined will constitute one year of math credit, but you will need to successfully pass all three terms to receive the full year of credit. It is possible to register for only one of these trimesters, but you must consult the instructor before registering and you will only receive one trimester of credit for successful completion.

Trimester 1 will cover basic Trigonometry. Trimester 2 will cover basic Consumer Math with a focus on ethical consumption and its impact on personal finances. Trimester 3 will cover an introduction to Statistics with an emphasis on probability. These three courses are designed for seniors and for juniors who have successfully completed math at the 300-level and are considering taking Statistics during their senior year. Please consult with the instructor before registering for these three courses.
CREDIT: MA (3 terms)

Statistics
Statistics is open to students who have successfully completed Math at the 300-level. This course focuses on exploring data with graphs and numerical summaries (e.g., mean and standard deviation), data collection methodology, probability, statistical inferences, and hypothesis testing. Students should consult with the instructor before registering for this class.

TEXT: Statistics: The Art and Science of Learning from Data, 2nd ed. by Agresti, Adam and Franklin (0135131995) and Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Precalculus
This course is intended for students who have been successful in Math 320. Students who were highly successful in MA310 could consider this course as well. In Precalculus, students will build on the algebraic methods learned in Algebra 2 by approaching the study of functions from an analytical and graphical approach. Topics include Polynomial and Rational Functions, Exponential and Logarithmic Functions, and Analytic Trigonometry.

TEXT: Precalculus, 4th ed. by Blitzer (0-321-55984-7) and Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Calculus
This course is open to students who have been successful in Precalculus. All students should consult with the instructor before registering for this class.

●Limits
●Derivatives
●Euler’s Method
●Integrals
●Differential Equations
●Applications

TEXT: Calculus of a Single Variable, 8th ed. by Larson, Hostetler and Edwards (0-618-50304-8) and Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)

Calculus Lab
This term-long course, offered in the Spring, provides students concurrently enrolled in Calculus with in-depth preparation for the Advanced Placement Exam in Calculus (AB). Students should consult with the instructor before registering for this class.
CREDIT: MA (term)

Calculus 2
This course is open to students who have successfully completed Calculus. The study of Calculus will be continued (Infinite Series, Polar Coordinates, Further Applications) and introductions to various other fields of advanced mathematics will be offered.
TEXT: Calculus of a Single Variable, 8th ed. by Larson, Hostetler and Edwards (0-618-50304-8); Calculus, 5th ed. By Hughes-Hallet, et al (978-0470-13159-6) and Instructor’s Handouts
CREDIT: MA (year)


MODERN LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (FL)
back to List of Credit Areas

Students are required to take six FL courses (2 years) to graduate (the admission requirement for the schools in the University of North Carolina college system is for two years of the same foreign language). All Foreign Language courses are year-long classes (3 credits per year).

FRENCH

Beginning French
The Beginning French program takes students through a variety of basic contexts such as friends, family, leisure-time activities, schooling, talking about your home, city, etc. Verb forms are primarily limited to the present tense. Students are introduced to francophone culture and current events as a central part of the curriculum. Frequent paired speaking exercises and various audio and video clips allow students to develop confidence in their listening and speaking ability. The goal of the course is to help students approach a Novice-Mid rating on the ACTFL Proficiency Scale in all four skill areas (reading, writing, listening, speaking). In addition to daily written assignments, additional listening and speaking activities outside the classroom are a necessary part of the language acquisition process.
CREDIT: FL (year)

Intermediate French
Prerequisite: Beginning French
This course builds on previous contexts and constructions, and introduces the two major past tenses. Cultural topics and current events continue to be a central component of the course. Various combinations of paired exercises, short listening and speaking activities from the classroom CD set, and frequent audio and video clips provide opportunities for students to develop their receptive skills and their ability to express themselves verbally in the target language. The goal of the course is to help students approach an Intermediate-Mid rating on the ACTFL Proficiency Scale. Students are expected to do additional listening and speaking exercises outside the classroom on a regular basis for reinforcement and practice.
CREDIT: FL (year)

Advanced French
Prerequisite: Intermediate French
This course is designed for students who want to go beyond the basic requirements for graduation, the goal being to help them attain a rating of at least Advanced-Low on the ACTFL proficiency scale. History and cultural studies go deeper and broader than in previous levels. Emphasis is on refining the students’ receptive and production skills, and on adding nuance and precision to their writing and oral expression. Willingness to interact in the target language is a must, as the class will be conducted primarily in French. In addition to frequent written exercises, students are required to do listening and speaking exercises outside the classroom as part of the course of study.
CREDIT: FL (year)

SPANISH

Spanish I
In this course students will develop a firm foundation in Spanish grammar which will enable them to master basic comprehension, reading, writing, and speaking skills. There is a strong emphasis on vocabulary memorization and on verb conjugations. The class is conducted increasingly in Spanish. Regular quizzes, chapter tests, and a final exam will be given.
CREDIT: FL (year)

Spanish II
This course is a continuation of Spanish I. Second-year Spanish is an intensive study in grammar and verb tenses. Students will expand on reading, writing, comprehension, and speaking skills. The class will be conducted primarily in Spanish. Regular quizzes, chapter tests, and a final exam will be given.
CREDIT: FL (year)
PREREQUISITE: Spanish I

Spanish III
This course will be conducted primarily in Spanish and will continue to focus on Spanish grammar, reading, writing, and speaking skills. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and give oral interviews and presentations in Spanish. Regular chapter tests and a final exam will be given.
CREDIT: FL (year)
PREREQUISITE: Spanish II

Spanish IV
This advanced-level class will be conducted entirely in Spanish. There will be an emphasis on in class discussions and class participation. The class will include advanced grammar, and Spanish and Latin American literature and music. Students will be expected to read literature and write analytical essays and papers as well as creative works in Spanish. An addition to the writings, tests and oral presentations will be used to evaluate students.
CREDIT: FL (year)
PREREQUISITE: Spanish III

Advanced Spanish
This course is an advanced-level class that will be conducted entirely in Spanish. There will be an emphasis on discussion. The class will include advanced grammar, picking up where Spanish IV left off. There will be a focus on Spanish and Latin American short stories, short novels, compositions, dramatic work, and poetry. Students will be required to write one longer essay per term as well as shorter pieces both creative and analytical. There will be essays, tests, and oral presentations.
CREDIT: FL (year)
PREREQUISITE: Spanish IV


PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PE)
back to List of Credit Areas

Students are required to take six total PE classes (2 full years) to graduate. Unless otherwise noted, all PE courses are term long. When a student completes a season on an Upper School Interscholastic Sports Team, he/she receives one PE credit.

Dance classes may be taken for either Cultural Arts or Physical Education credit. Descriptions of these classes are found under Cultural Arts.

Advanced Dance: Collaboration & Performance (see Cultural Arts)

Contemporary Dance Styles (see Cultural Arts)

Dance Composition (see Cultural Arts)

Dance: Shaping an Impulse
(see Cultural Arts)

Experiential Anatomy for Dancers and Athletes (see Cultural Arts)

Improvisation and Site Specific Dance (see Cultural Arts)

Modern Dance: Collaboration & Performance (see Cultural Arts)

Social Dance (see Cultural Arts)


Interscholastic Sports Teams
Students receive one PE credit for each term of an interscholastic sport.

Fall - Soccer (boys); Volleyball (girls); Tennis (girls); Cross-Country Running (co-ed)
Winter - Basketball (boys and girls); Ultimate Frisbee (co-ed); Swimming (boys and girls)
Spring – Baseball (boys), Soccer (girls); Track and Field (boys and girls), Ultimate Frisbee (co-ed); Tennis (boys)

Other Physical Education Courses
back to Physical Education

Bowling
We go by CFS bus to bowl at Mardi Gras Lanes in Durham and bowl one game per session (Tues and Thurs); no prior experience required. Fee required (about $6 per session, or $120 for the term).
CREDIT: PE (term)

Floor Hockey
In this class we will be playing the perfect winter sport, that’s right HOCKEY. Granted we will not be on a sheet of ice, but rather the Quaker Dome floor. Nevertheless, we will learn the essentials of the game; the anatomy of the stick, grips, passing, shooting, puck handling, positioning/strategy, the rules, and most importantly the lingo. Words such as barn, hoser, driftwood, brain bucket, biscuit, yard sale, and summer teeth will take on new meanings as we dive deep into the colorful culture that is hockey. All that and more will be wrapped up in this fast paced, action packed class.
CREDIT: PE (term)

Soccer Class
This class is designed to give the students an opportunity to receive a good workout from playing soccer in the gymnasium. A futsal ball is used, which is smaller and heavier than a regulation size soccer ball; this is more conducive to indoor play. The class provides the right balance of fun and intensity.
CREDIT: PE (term)

Strength and Conditioning
This class is designed for students to gain a greater understanding of the proper techniques, methods and training regimens that make for a successful workout experience. Along with a valuable stretching program, we will explore multiple training programs and a myriad of effective movements/exercises that target all the muscle groups, plyometrics and cardio possibilities. Students will be asked to keep a folder in order to house all their daily workout logs. These will enable us to chart our progress through the trimester. Workout sessions will invariably be structured, with students rotating through four stations: upper body, lower body, core, and cardio. Some days the exercises will be pre-selected, while on others, students will have the opportunity to construct their own individualized workout plans. Other possibilities include: circuit training, muscle group focus, yoga and cross training. By the close of the term, students should feel comfortable designing and executing their own successful programs.
CREDIT: PE (term)

Teams
Girls and Boys Soccer, Girls and Boys Tennis, Girls and Boys’ Basketball, Cross Country, Ultimate, Swimming, Track and Field, Girls Volleyball, Boys Baseball. Track and Field
CREDIT: PE (term)

Tennis Class
In this class we will concentrate on absorbing the basics of tennis within an atmosphere of entertaining instruction and fun. Emphasis will be on having fun while developing our skills. Students will learn proper grips, stroke mechanics, movement and positioning, along with the esoteric scoring system. Interspersed throughout the class we will play a variety of games that will enable students to practice their skills in enjoyable and engaging ways.
CREDIT: PE (term)

Walking and Talking
In this PE class, we will walk the paths around campus and through the local communities. We will walk the well-marked paths of Duke Forest, but we will also get out and explore some new places. While we are walking, we will have an opportunity to get to know each other better. All are welcome.
CREDIT: PE (term)

Yoga In In this class we will explore all the basics of a complete yoga practice. We will learn a variety of yoga poses, specific ways of breathing, guided meditation, restorative poses and deep rest techniques. Our practice of yoga will help increase strength and flexibility. We will also be developing an understanding of clear alignment that can help prevent injury and ease discomfort in the body. Most important, we’ll be learning and practicing powerful tools to help alleviate the negative effects of stress and support mindfulness. The word yoga means “union” or “connection” in Sanskrit, which is the ancient language of Yoga. Ultimately yoga is a practice that supports our ability to be connected to the deepest truth of who we are and also to be in harmony with the world around us. CREDIT: PE (term)


SCIENCE (SC)
back to List of Credit Areas

Students are required to take one year of Biological Science (SC-BS) and one year of Physical Science (SC-PS) to graduate. They are required to take one additional year of science for a total of three years of science courses. Within each science, courses are divided by level. Introductory level courses are open to all students and intended for first year students. Intermediate courses have a pre-requisite either in science or in math. Upper and Advanced level courses are intended for juniors and seniors.

Students are required to take one year of Biological Science (SC-BS) and one year of Physical Science (SC-PS) to graduate. They are required to take one additional year of science for a total of three years of science courses. Within each science, courses are divided by level. Introductory level courses are open to all students and intended for first year students. Intermediate courses have a pre-requisite either in science or in math. Upper and Advanced level courses are intended for juniors and seniors.

Biological Science (SC-BS)

Introduction to Biology
Water, Land, and Growth are the themes of this year-long lab science course. It includes a study of the nature of water, theories about the origin of life, the biochemistry of life, and a survey of life in water and on the land with an emphasis on the history of life on Earth and its continuing evolution. We examine molecular aspects of growth including: the structure of DNA and protein synthesis, cell division to form multicellular organisms, reproduction and inheritance. The course is taught through hands-on activities, inquiry, and modeling of concepts. All first year students must enroll in Introduction to Biology.
Credit: SC-BS (year)

Advanced Biology
Prerequisite: Students must have successfully completed both Introduction to Biology and Chemistry. Statistics is encouraged.
This intensive year-long course will cover the topics and labs from the Advanced Placement curriculum. Students need to consult with the instructor before registering for this class. Once a week during the first two terms, class will extend twenty minutes into the lunch period, and there will be an additional lab period in the third term.
CREDIT: SC-BS (year)

Environmental Science
Prerequisite: This advanced level course is for seniors who have successfully completed Senior Seminar: Environmental History.
Designed for motivated students interested in Environmental Science as a follow on from Environmental History. While Homo sapiens sapiens has succeeded in claiming the planet, degrading aspects of it in the process, life is ultimately resilient. Our increasing environmental awareness, understanding, creativity and action are giving rise to sustainable practices and solving issues. A goal for the class is to instill hope for the future as we explore emerging solutions to environmental problems, and so build a realistic vision of what can be achieved: an Earth that remains rich and diverse and a good place to call “home.” The work of the class will include taking on an environmental issue on campus and using creativity to find and enact a practical solution, and so make a difference.

Expectations: a positive attitude and active participation in every aspect of class. Students will write reading responses and complete unit quizzes. Students will present their project, demonstrating the work they have done and the difference it achieves.
CREDIT: SC-BS (term)

Biology Term classes

To take intermediate level courses in Biology, students must have successfully completed Introduction to Biology. Specific eligibility requirements are listed under each course.

Biotechnology
Prerequisites: Introductory Biology, completion or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry, and completion or concurrent enrollment in Math 300 or above
This term-long course will investigate the structure and function of DNA, and explore how the tools of biotechnology are used to ‘cut, copy and paste’ genes from one organism into another. Through virtual labs and hands-on activities, students learn how to use the tools of biotechnology including restriction enzymes, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), gel electrophoresis and bacterial transformation. In addition students research and present current advances in biotechnology.
CREDIT: SC-BS (term)

Forensic Science
Prerequisite: Introductory Biology
This course will provide an introduction to the scientific methods used to examine physical evidence at a crime scene such as fingerprints, blood, hair, fibers and DNA. Through case studies, we will explore how this evidence can lead to solving crimes. In laboratory activities, students will “lift” and characterize fingerprints, compare hair and fiber samples in the microscope, perform burn tests to identify fibers, and learn how to use gel electrophoresis to visualize unique patterns of DNA for identification purposes. In addition, students will work collaboratively in groups to construct a crime scene for the rest of the class to solve based on forensic evidence.
CREDIT: SC-BS (term)

Microbiology
Prerequisite: Introductory Biology
The Microbiology term-elective explores the diversity and impact of microorganisms, particularly bacteria, on human health, the environment and use in biotechnology. The course will explore bacterial growth on plates and liquid media, sterile (aseptic) technique, and the differences in prokaryotic cell membrane and cell wall structure. Laboratory experiences include differential staining techniques, microscopy, and culturing bacteria. In addition, students will prepare an independent research project describing a disease-causing pathogen of interest.
CREDIT: SC-BS (term)

Plant Biology
Prerequisite: Introductory Biology
Because members of the Plant Kingdom live on a different time-scale than humans, we tend to overlook their subtleties and underappreciate their services. In this class, we use observation and lab experiences to examine the hugely successful life strategies of plants and gain an appreciation of our total dependence on them.
CREDIT: SC-BS (term)

Physical Science (SC-PS)

Chemistry
Prerequisite: Completion of Intro to Biology
This class is a year-long investigation of the composition and interactions of matter. Topics covered include: states of matter, physical and chemical properties of matter, atomic structure, chemical reactions, solution calculations, basic stoichiometry, acids and bases, molecular geometry and thermodynamics. Laboratory experiments conducted by students will form an important part of the course. CREDIT: SC-PS (year)

Advanced Chemistry
Prerequisites: successful completion of Chemistry and completion or concurrent enrollment in Precalculus, and permission of the instructor. Strong math skills required.
In this year-long course students will further their understanding of chemical properties, chemical reactions, quantum theory, stoichiometry, oxidation-reduction reactions and gas laws. Students will be introduced to advanced chemistry topics including reaction kinetics, chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, radioactive decay, calorimetry, acid-base titration, spectroscopy and electrochemistry. Laboratory experiments will supplement classroom instruction. This class will not follow the Advanced Placement curriculum however students may prepare independently to take the exam.
CREDIT: SC-PS (year)

Physics
Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry and Precalculus, and permission of the instructor
This year long science course is a study of mechanics, force, work, energy, momentum, wave behavior, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, and relativity.
CREDIT: SC-PS (year)

Advanced Physics Prerequisite: Completion of Calculus 1 This course is a year-long, calculus-based survey of basic physics from Newtonian mechanics through electricity and magnetism. The methods of calculus will be applied to everything studied in the Physics class, and more advanced topics will be taken up.
CREDIT: SC-PS (year)

Geology: Materials and History
Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry
This one-term course begins with a looked at the discovery and basic mechanisms of plate tectonics and the earth’s general structure. We then learn the properties and identification of minerals and igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Finally, we move to stratigraphy, paleontology, and the history of the earth.
CREDIT: SC-PS (term)

Geology: Earth Processes
Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry
This one-term course begins with a looked at the discovery and basic mechanisms of plate tectonics and the earth’s general structure. We then study structural geology, volcanology, magnetism of the earth, and seismology.
CREDIT: SC-PS (term)

Astronomy
Prerequisite: Completion of Chemistry
In a one-term survey of major topics in Astronomy, we follow the chronology of discoveries starting with the first attempts to measure the distance to the sun and ending with the reasons for postulating the existence of dark matter and dark energy. The method of approach is to develop an understanding of a particular set of physical principles and then apply them.
CREDIT: SC-PS (term)


SOCIAL STUDIES (SS)
back to List of Credit Areas

Students are required to take nine credits in Social Studies to graduate. These credits must be distributed as follows: three credits for the required year-long freshman Geography course, three credits for the required year-long sophomore Global History course, and three credits for the required year-long junior US History course. Senior seminars (two terms), open to seniors only, are recommended but not required. Elective (term-long) social studies courses are open to students of all ages except where otherwise specified.

Introductory Level

Geography
Required for all freshmen
The purpose of this course is to provide you with a comprehensive introduction to physical and human geography. This course is designed to connect core concepts with case studies in which you will be asked to apply your geographical thinking to real world dilemmas related to the scarcity of natural resources, human population growth, globalization, and the growing polarization between those with access to what is necessary for life and those who routinely go without. Thematic links between this course and your Foundations of Literature and Biology courses will help you grapple with these dilemmas by bridging the perspectives of the humanities, the natural sciences and the social sciences. Keeping one eye on your End-of-Year of Experience in Newton Grove, we will look for ways to connect the theories and facts of human & environmental geography with your growing ability to think through and act out your own geographical imagination in the world around you.
CREDIT: SS (required) (year)

Intermediate Level

Global History
Required for all sophomores
This theme-based course examines the ways in which human cultural, political, and social systems have evolved over time. The course will be divided into several units that consider historical periods of great change and conflict. The course will pay special attention to ways in which cultures and empires have formed, come into contact with one another, clashed with each other, and occasionally collapsed. Religious thought, the impacts of trade and war, and the practice of power will frame the units of inquiry, and in addition to numerous smaller assignments, a work of original historical research is required.
CREDIT: SS (required) (year)

Upper Level

U.S. History
Required for all juniors, required of all students for graduation
This survey class begins with the migration of human beings to the Americas and examines US History up to the 1970s. Students will gain knowledge in historical content as well as practice and instruction in various historical skills. This includes expository and analytical writing, research, primary and secondary source analysis, oral history, public speaking, and family history. Students will examine how and why perspective shapes competing versions of history, and through reading, writing, and discussion, will learn to critically examine historical assertions and analysis. Course content is, when possible, coordinated with the content of American Literature.
CREDIT: SS (required) (year)

Advanced Level
Advanced level courses are open only to seniors.

Senior Seminar: Political Philosophy
How do we know what we think we know about the world? How can we be certain? Is there an objective reality that exists outside of our perceptions, or do our perceptions create reality? Is there a theory of Truth, or do we exist in a world comprised of multiple and competing truths? Once we discern what we know about the world and how we know it, how does that inform our ability to act in the world, both morally and politically? If individual people have different ideas about what is true and how to act, is there a way to determine the best one or a have a legitimate form of authority to which we all agree to adhere, regardless of individuals' ideas? What are different ways to theorize the relationship between oneself and the world, and which ones are the most ethical to live by?

In this senior seminar class, students will examine how answers to this question have evolved over time. We will examine both philosophical and political responses to these questions, starting in the ancient Greek world, but focusing primarily on modern European ideas generated since the French Revolution. The course will be reading and writing intensive, and class sessions will revolve around in-depth discussion of political philosophy and history. Substantial preparation during the summer gets the course started, and the class culminates with the writing and oral defense of a major paper.
CREDIT: SS (two terms)

Senior Seminar: Environmental History
The goal of this course is to provide motivated seniors with a chance to pursue advanced social studies work, in terms of both content and skills. The level of this class is intended to help seniors bridge the distance between high school survey courses into the kind of focused coursework they will encounter in college. This course will also inevitably call on each student to develop his or her own personal view of how to live in the present American society with a minimum of damage to our planet’s already battered biological systems.

The general theme of “environmental history” is divided into two parts. The first (Fall Term) will look at human environmental impacts on the United States, from pre-contact Native Americans to today. It will be divided into topical units: “Forest”, “Soil”, “Wildlife”, and “Invasive Species”. The Fall term will involve readings, not just from the Hughes textbook, but from American writers grappling with our relationship to “the land” or “Nature”, starting in the 1830s and going up to the present day. Examples of such authors will be both well-known (Thoreau, Muir, Leopold, Abbey, Berry) and lesser known (George Perkins Marsh, etc.). As for the second term (Winter), its theme will be the modern industrial world, with a particular focus on global climate change. Expectations: positive & prepared discussion participation will be a major ingredient of Credit. There will also be reading responses and unit quizzes, and a choice between a long class presentation or research paper for each term (topic chosen by student, with instructor's approval).
CREDIT: SS (two terms)

Senior Seminar: Gothic Literature and Society (see Language Arts)


Social Studies Electives

Current Events
What's happening in the news? This discussion-based current events course is simply that: reading, discussing and analyzing the news. There will be an emphasis on global news: what's happening, what it means, and how the events around the world relate to us. We will hone in on some key issues and stories as they unfold around the globe, as well as keep track of (potentially) smaller, daily news stories. Students will also research issues/stories of their choice.
CREDIT: SS (term)

Egyptology
There are few civilizations in history that have managed to cast such a spell on the human imagination as that of Ancient Egypt. In this course we will immerse ourselves in that world! In addition to learning the basics of Egyptian history and culture, we will explore the mythology, geography, and archeology of this ancient land. By the end of the course students will be able to read and write in hieroglyphs, and should come away from this class knowing proper Egyptian burial techniques - since we will be embalming, mummifying, and sending off into the afterlife a "Pharaoh."
CREDIT: SS (term)

Hip-Hop History
Mixing school and hip-hop is a dangerous endeavor, one that has the potential to undermine the subversive and creative aspects of the culture. How do you go about incorporating all that hip-hop has to offer into a classroom setting? What steps must be taken to ensure that the culture is respected but also critiqued? While negative elements certainly permeate, particularly in the more popular forms of rap music, this must not be the sole focus. As with all art forms contradictions abound, positive uplift and astute social commentary reside side by side with misogynist and homophobic lyrics. Focusing on one aspect, regardless of the intent, does the culture a disservice. Artists since the arrival of hip-hop have been some of the most prescient cultural critics, and we would do well to listen to their observations. Perhaps the most compelling reason to study hip-hop culture is that it is a reflection of our society. All that we rightly condemn in hip hop we should recognize as manifestations of our own ethos. Rap artists are our popular sociologists, honestly commenting on all subjects that deserve our attention. Global politics, democracy, economics, history, poverty, race, gender relations, criminal injustice, and more have all fallen under the gaze of rap artists throughout the years. Their songs can provide gateways into considering these subjects and much more. Learning the history of hip-hop becomes an essential way to learn about the history, the present and the future of our civilization. While the origins of the music come from a simple desire to party and enjoy the company of others, it has evolved into something more, while still retaining a joyfulness at its core.
CREDIT: SS (term)

Human Evolution
This term-length class on physical anthropology is intended to bridge biological science with humanities. We will use a detailed coloring book (yes, like those used in medical schools), plus videos (and perhaps a field trip to the Duke Lemur Center) to cover the full range of primate evolution to the point where we diverged from the great apes. We will cover our nearest extinct relatives (Neanderthals and the mysterious tiny “hobbits” recently found in Indonesia) and what can be learned about our species from the behavior of our nearest living relatives (apes and monkeys). Expectations will include quizzes, some readings, and a choice of either a long presentation or a research paper on a topic chosen by the student (either on fossil primates or living species) and approved by the instructor.
CREDIT: SS (term)

Japanese History and Literature
This course will be an introduction to the literature, culture, and history of Japan. Using as our basis major works of literature, we will work chronologically from the 9th century (when we read excerpts from the world's first novel, The Tale of Genji) to the present. Along the way we will learn about many of the most famous features of the Japanese world, including Bushido, the Samurai, Zen Buddhism, and of course, anime and manga. When we reach the modern era, special attention will be paid to the literature of WWII and the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The final project of the class will be either the creation of the students' very own "Pillow Book," modeled after the famous Heian Era work by Lady Sei Shonagon, or, for those artistically inclined, a homemade manga.
CREDIT: SS (term)

Modern Middle East
This term-length class will start with an introduction on Islam, will cover the role of the colonial powers in subverting the Ottoman Empire in the 1910s, and then will move on to the ideals and motives driving the founders of the Israeli state and those of their Palestinian opposition (from about the 1920s on), and the same for the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. Another urgent topic is to explain the widespread use of "terrorism" (as in indiscriminate violence) in the region, up to al Qaeda, Islamic State, etc. Expectations will include: quizzes, some reading responses, and a term research paper or class presentation.
CREDIT: SS (term)

Roman World
This class is a Social Studies term elective . In addition to the conventional coverage of Roman history, politics, religion and society, we’ll also be approaching the subject as the first example of “globalization” in the Western world. Students will research a specific cultural area of the Roman Empire, and will look at how the Romans incorporated that region, culturally and economically as well as by military conquest. Expectations will include a term paper on that topic, unit tests, and occasional homework essays.
CREDIT: SS (term)

We the People?
When one thinks about the founding of this nation, the men involved, the documents they produced and lives they led, there is a general sense of reverie. These hallowed individuals are often invoked as near gods, to be idolized along with their prodigious achievements, namely the Declaration of Independence, The Constitution, The Bill of Rights and the government that followed. Sure, we all despise Washington, DC at certain times but these grievances remain individualized, and never question the near universal veneration of our nation’s creation story (the master narrative) and the structures that emerged in its wake. Any criticisms are characterized as anti-American and disregarded. As a consequence our capacity to think critically about our nation’s founding and the resulting institutions has been severely attenuated. This trimester-long class aims to shift the conversation. To begin, we will look at the birth of the nation. The context of the late eighteenth century will be explored, the arguments put forth, the disagreements, the resolutions, along with the winners and losers will be up for discussion and debate. Instead of reading about the constitutional debates, The Constitution, The Federalist Papers, The Bill of Rights, and various Supreme Court decisions we will actually read these documents and analyze their contents, critiquing intentions and assessing outcomes. Through readings, critical writing, role-plays, discussion, debates, and mock trials, we will engage with and demystify the people and documents that brought you a nation.
CREDIT: SS (term)





 
Bookmark and Share

Carolina Friends School          
4809 Friends School Road
Durham, NC 27705
919.383.6602 tel / 919.383.6009 fax / info@cfsnc.org

powered by finalsite